Sociology

KS4 Intent: Sociology

The study of Sociology at key stage 4 offer students an insight into social and cultural issues. It helps to develop an open minded and critical approach to contemporary the issues of culture, identity, families, education, and social equality. Students investigate key questions such as ‘What are British values?’, ‘How is Identity formed?’, ‘Are some family types better than others?’, ‘Why do some students perform better in education than others?’, ‘Does the structure of society force people to commit crime?’ and ‘How are life chances affected by social class?’.  Transferable skills acquired included the ability to investigate facts and make deductions based on evidence, to develop opinions and new ideas on social issues and the ability to analyse and better understand the social world. Students will develop their communication skills by comparing and contrasting reasoned arguments and making substantiated conclusions based on evidence.

Implementation:

Year

Term

Topic

Knowledge, skills and understanding

Window for Assessment

9

1

Unit 1: Cultural Transmission of values and values

Key Concepts: Culture, norms, values, roles, status, identity, sanctions and cultural diversity.

Debates over the acquisition of identity: Nature/nurture - examples of feral children and cultural diversity

The process of socialisation and agents of socialisation: Family, education, media, peer group. How agents of socialisation pass on culture and identity? For example: gender, class and ethnic identity informal and formal social control

This unit focuses on the themes of socialisation, identity and culture. Learners will be encouraged to contemplate how they acquire their individual identity. The purpose of this unit is to provide the building blocks for understanding processes in society and to embed a knowledge of specialised subject vocabulary.

 

Literacy will be supported through terminology, definitions and structured writing. Enrichment, life and work skills are encouraged with opportunities for independent research and group work to encourage communication and cooperation. Awareness of careers and relevant post 16 study will be addressed, and a display board will be made to showcase opportunities.

 

 

AO1: Factual Knowledge =subject specific vocabulary recall quizzes

AO2: Application of knowledge to question =Previous exam question homework

 

Unit 1 Assessment

9

2

Unit 2: Sociological Research Methods and Application:

Usefulness of different types of data, primary and secondary data, qualitative and quantitative data. Sources of secondary data, including diaries, journals, official and non-official statistics.

Methods of Research:  

Qualitative and quantitative methods – Questionnaires, structured and unstructured interviews, different types of observations. The value, practical application and strengths and weaknesses of different methods in terms of validity, reliability, ethics, representativeness and mixed methods approaches.

Sampling processes:

Representative and non-representative sampling techniques. Practical issues affecting research - Access to subjects of research, gatekeeper to allow access and time and cost of research.

Ethical issues affecting research

Informed consent, confidentiality, harm to participants, deception, strategies used by sociologists to address issues

 

Term 2 beginnings with sociological research methods and their application. At this time it is presented as a separate unit; however, research methods will permeate the entire course.  Learners will need to understand the appropriateness, reliability and validity of different research methods in order to consider the evidence used to support or challenge theories in their future study of families, education, stratification and crime to follow.

 

Literacy is encouraged by a continued emphasis on subject specific vocabulary and developing structured answers using the PEEL format.

 

Numeracy opportunities will be gathering and interpreting data using graphs and charts.

 

Learners will work in groups collaboratively, which will improve communication and provide an opportunity to develop leadership skills. Further enrichment, life and work skills are developed by the study of interview styles to create an appreciation of formal interviews, relevant to preparation for employment and post 16 study. Career opportunities in the area of sociological research, research generally and statistical analysis will be discussed.

 

 

 

AO1: Factual Knowledge =subject specific vocabulary recall quizzes

AO2: Application of knowledge to question =Previous exam question homework

 AO3: Analysis and evaluation of key concepts = Research Project

 

 

Unit 2 Assessment

9

3

Unit 3 Family

What is the family? Nuclear family, extended family, reconstituted family, lone parent family, single sex family, cohabiting family, beanpole family, ethnic minority family forms, global family forms including polygamy, arranged marriages and one-child family policy in China.

Structures: Changes in social norms, secularisation, values and laws, feminism, economic factors, technology and immigration and their impact on family diversity, including the work of Rapoports, divorce rates and serial monogamy, cohabitation, single parent families, later age of marriage, singlehood ,family size.

Changes / Relationships: Changes in social norms, secularisation, values and laws, feminism, economic factors, technology and their impact on segregated and joint conjugal roles, symmetrical families, domestic division of labour, New Man, decision making / money management dual career families, leisure activities, theory of symmetrical family and principle of stratified diffusion, developed from the functionalist perspective of Willmott and Young. Child-rearing patterns and child-centred families, ‘boomerang’ children and ‘sandwich’ generation.

Theories: Conflict versus consensus debate on the role of the family Functionalism - Functionalist theory of the role and functions of family, such as Parsons and primary socialisation and stabilisation of adult personalities.

Marxism - Marxist theory of families serving the interests of capitalism, including the work of Zaretsky. Feminism - critique of family as a patriarchal institution, including the work of Delphy and Leonard and Oakley. New Right views of family.

Criticisms: Loss of traditional functions, lack of contact with wider kinship network, dysfunctional families, status and role of women, isolation and unrealistic expectations, marital breakdown and divorce, the dark side of family life including domestic violence and decline of the traditional family.

 

In term 3 learners will study the family in greater depth. This will build on concepts from Unit 1 to gain a deeper, more theoretical understanding of the social world and the process of socialisation. Unit 2 has provided learners with an understanding of how sociological research is conducted. Learners now have the skills needed to critically assess and evaluate theories relating to the family.

 

In contemporary UK there is a variety of family types this unit will consider diversity of family structures thus promoting British Values of tolerance and equality.

 

A continued emphasis on subject specific vocabulary, structured answers using the PEEL format and essay planning will improve literacy. This unit provides learners with the opportunity give and receive feedback via AfL activities.

 

Career opportunities will continue to be mentioned when relevant. With reference to relevant post 16 further study learners working at greater depth will study A’level texts to explore the work of key sociologists notably the Rapaports and Eli Zaretsky.  

 

 

 

 

AO1: Factual Knowledge =subject specific vocabulary recall quizzes

AO2: Application of knowledge to question =Previous 8-mark exam question homework

 AO3: Analysis and evaluation of key concepts = Assessed 15-mark essay question

 

Unit 3 Assessment

10

1

Unit 4 Education

Sociological theories of the role of education: Conflict versus consensus debate on the role of education. Functionalism- Functionalist theory of education as serving the needs of society and the economy, facilitating social mobility and fostering social cohesion. The work of Durkheim on education as the transmission of norms and values. Achieved status and education operating on meritocratic principles, including the work of Parsons.

Marxism - Marxist theory of education serving the needs of capitalism, education maintaining inequality, including the work of Bowles and Gintis on the correspondence theory. Feminism - theory of education perpetuating patriarchy, including the work of Becky Francis on the patriarchal nature of schools

Processes inside schools: Processes within schools affecting educational achievement, labelling, including the work of Hargreaves, hidden curriculum, streaming, banding, anti-school sub-cultures including the work of Willis, teacher expectations, including the work of Ball, self fulfilling prophecy.

Patterns of educational achievement: Patterns of attainment by gender, social class and ethnicity.

Factors affecting educational achievement: Social class-

Contribution of material factors, including the work of Halsey on class based inequalities, cultural factors, labelling, catchment areas, types of school, including the work of Ball on streaming, choice and competition between schools, counter school cultures, including the work of Willis.

Ethnicity- Material and cultural factor, curriculum, labelling, racism. Gender- Employment opportunities for women, feminism, feminisation of school, crisis of masculinity, peer pressure and sub-cultures.

 

Term 1 of year 10 begins with study of education. This will build on concepts from Unit 1 and Unit 3 to allow learners to gain a deeper, more theoretical understanding of the social world with an awareness of the role of education in socialisation and life chances. Unit 2 has provided learners with understanding of how sociological research is conducted so they have the skills needed to critically assess and evaluate theories relating to the education.

 

There is a continued literacy emphasis on subject specific vocabulary, structured answers using the PEEL format and essay planning. Mastery in the presentation of arguments, making judgements, and drawing conclusions is a focus during this unit.

 

 

 

 

AO1: Factual Knowledge =subject specific vocabulary recall quizzes

AO2: Application of knowledge to question =Previous 8-mark exam question homework

 AO3: Analysis and evaluation of key concepts = Assessed 15-mark essay question

 

Unit 4 Assessment

10

2

Unit 5 Applied Methods of Sociological Enquiry

The process of research design:

Choosing a research area. establishing an aim and/or hypothesis, choosing a method, use of pilot study, selection of sampling techniques, analysis of data, usefulness of mixed methods approach Interpreting data.

How to interpret:  graphs, diagrams, charts and tables in order to discern patterns and trends.

 

In term 2 of year 10 learners revisit Research Methods, looking at application of the theory to real research scenarios. Learners will gain mastery in research methods and critically assessing sociological research.

 

Literacy opportunities will be how to structure a research report. Numeracy is an important element of this unit with learners gathering and interpreting data using graphs and charts.

 

Enrichment, life and work skills include working in groups collaboratively so improving communication and providing an opportunity to develop leadership skills. Oracy will be developed with students presenting reports, asking and responding to questions. Career opportunities in the area of sociological research, research generally and statistical analysis will be discussed.

 

 

AO1: Factual Knowledge =subject specific vocabulary recall quizzes

AO2: Application of knowledge to question =Previous exam question homework

 AO3: Analysis and evaluation of key concepts = Research Project

 

 

Unit 5 Assessment



11

1

Unit 6 Social Stratification

Understanding Social Structures: Equality/inequality in relation to class, gender, ethnicity, age, disability and sexuality including evidence and examples. Examples from: education, crime, Income and wealth health, family, work, media.

Factors which may influence access to life chances and power: Class, gender, ethnicity, age, disability and sexuality.

Social construction of identity/roles, status, prejudice, discrimination, stereotyping, labelling, scapegoating, media representation, legislation, moral panics, sub-cultures, Social class - private schooling, old boys’ network, affluent worker, the work of Devine

Gender - sexism, glass ceiling, patriarchy, the work of Walby, crisis of masculinity. Ethnicity - racism, institutional racism.

Age – ageism. Disability - medical and social models of disability. Sexuality – homophobia. Religion and Belief.

Poverty as a social issue: Absolute and relative poverty, the work of Townsend on relative deprivation. material deprivation. An understanding of groups prone to poverty Culture of poverty. The work of Murray on the underclass and ‘Cycle of Deprivation

Social exclusion and inclusion

Impact of globalisation.

 

 

This unit concentrates on social differentiation, power and stratification. Factors that impact on life chances are an important element of this unit. Learners need to have prior learning of processes within society. Further mastery will be developed by exploring the concept of social inequality in relation to social class, gender, ethnicity, age, disability, and sexuality.

 

Literacy will be a continued emphasis on subject specific vocabulary, structured answers using the PEEL format and essay planning. Prominence is now placed on the presentation of arguments, making judgements and drawing conclusions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

AO1: Factual Knowledge =subject specific vocabulary recall quizzes

AO2: Application of knowledge to question =Previous exam question homework

 AO3: Analysis and evaluation of key concepts = Essay questions

 

 

Unit 6 Assessment

11

2

Unit 7 Crime

What is crime? What is deviance? Historical and cultural variations. Social construction of crime and deviance.

Patterns of criminal and deviant behaviour: Informal and formal social control and unwritten rules. Agencies of informal social control - Family/ Peer group/ Education/ Religion/ Media/

Sanctions Agencies of formal social control - Role of the police and courts.

Theories: Functionalism - Functions of crime, Anomie, the work of Merton, strain theory.

Subcultural - Albert Cohen and delinquent sub-cultures. Marxism - Chambliss and differential enforcement of the law white collar and corporate crime. Interactionism - notion of the typical offender, Labelling Self-fulfilling prophecy, Becker and the deviant career, moral panics. Feminism - Social control, Heidensohn on female conformity, poverty, Carlen on chivalry thesis.

Ethnicity and Crime - racism institutional racism,

Scapegoating.

Sources of data, patterns and trends of criminal behaviour - Official statistics victim and self-report studies, usefulness of sources of data on crime, dark figure of crime, unreported and unrecorded crime, police bias and labelling, moral panics, invisible crime

 

 

The study of crime brings together all the sociological knowledge of processes and structures from prior units. Learners now understand sociological theories and can apply these theories to crime.

 

Literacy will focus on subject specific vocabulary, structured answers using the PEEL format, presentation of arguments, making judgements and drawing conclusions.

 

Crime builds on numeracy skills from units 2 and 5. Learners have developed mastery in analysing data and can now interpret crime statistics and make reasoned judgements based on the evidence.

 

 

AO1: Factual Knowledge =subject specific vocabulary recall quizzes

AO2: Application of knowledge to question =Previous exam question homework

 AO3: Analysis and evaluation of key concepts = Essay questions

 

 

Unit 7 Assessment


11

3

Revision

The sociology examination is in mid-May. This is a short term with a solid focus on mastery in relation to examination techniques. There will be a concentration on question interpretation and how to achieve maximum marks for each answer.

 

A01 Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of sociological theories, concepts, evidence and methods.

A02 Apply knowledge and understanding and sociological theories.

A03 Analyse and evaluate sociological theories, concepts, evidence and methods in order to construct arguments, make judgements and draw conclusions.

 

2 Exam Papers:

Paper 1 – 50%

Unit 1: Cultural Transmission of norms and values

Unit 2: Sociological research methods and application

Unit 3: Family

Unit 4: Education

Paper 2 – 50%

Unit 5: Applied methods and sociological enquiry

Unit 6: Social Stratification

Unit 7: Crime

 

 

 

KS5 Intent: SOCIOLOGY

The study of Sociology at Key Stage 5 allows students acquire knowledge and critical understanding of contemporary society and social changes. Students have the opportunity to develop a broad set of desirable key skills, including the ability to analyse and formulate clear, logical arguments, develop strong critical thinking skills, and consider issues with a global outlook. This course will allow students who have taken GCSE Sociology to capitalise on their understanding of key issues within sociology whilst adding depth and breadth. For example, the GCSE question of “How are life chances affected by social class?” is now expanded to include the concepts of social mobility, vertical and horizontal segregation, the digital divide, and the impact of isolation and marginalisation. Students who are new to the subject will initially learn the key language of sociology and then adapt it to the higher level material. Transferable skills are learned within the context of contemporary issues, from critically considering the role of the media in shaping public opinion to using their digital footprint to their advantage in professional settings.

Implementation:

Year

Term

Topic

Knowledge, skills and understanding

Window for Assessment

12

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Component 1 – Introducing Socialisation, Culture and Identity

 

Section A: Socialisation, Culture & Identity

  • Types of Culture
  • Cultural Hybridity
  • Primary and Secondary Socialisation
  • The Nature-Nurture Debate
  • Social Control
  • The Concept of Identity
  • Ethnicity and Identity
  • Nationality and Identity
  • Gender and Identity
  • Class Identity
  • Age Identity
  • Sexuality and Identity
  • Disability and Identity
  • Hybrid Identities

The study of A Level Sociology begins with an introduction to the key sociological concepts and theories that students will build on for the rest of the year. For students who have taken Sociology at GCSE, this first unit gives them confidence whilst allowing them to add depth to their knowledge. This means that by the time the students complete the first part of Section A (key terms and how to apply them to sources), all will be on a level playing field.

 

The students then carry on to investigating types of identity. This is an engaging and often very personal exploration, with students being able to reflect on the importance of various influences on their own identity. Class and gender are particularly powerful, as students consider their own perceptions of class and gender and how this shapes the views of society about them. Cultural capital is introduced early on this half term, with students exploring how differences in opportunities and experiences within their family and social groups can impact their academic and professional success as well as their perceived place in society.

 

In the second half term, students carry on learning about the impact of age, sexuality and disability on identity. They also begin their first real-life investigation by developing and carrying out a questionnaire on people’s perceptions of ageism. This allows students to consider how both people their age and those of their grandparents’ generation are viewed and view each other and come to a conclusion as to the true impact of ageism. This engages students, allows them to apply their learning in a practical way, and begins to build their research methods skills, which will be focused on in Component two.

The final section on hybrid identities is one that students find interesting; they are able to explore the demography of Liverpool and learn about the rich variety of cultural groups and their impact on the city; students also relate well to the idea of cultural appropriation through the example of music festivals.

Topic Assessments on:

-agents of socialisation

-definition of youth subcultures

-gender and age identity

 

-End of Half Term 1 Test on Key Definitions

 

Ageism Questionnaire

 

 

2

Continuation of Component 1 – Introducing Socialisation, Culture and Identity

 

Completion of Component 2 - Section B Option 2: Youth Subcultures

  • Defining Youth Culture
  • The Emergence of Youth
  • Functionalist Approach of Youth Culture
  • Marxist and Neo-Marxist Theories of Youth Subcultures
  • Feminist Theories of Youth Subcultures
  • Postmodernist Views of Youth Subcultures
  • Subcultures as Related to Social Class, Gender and Ethnicity
  • Subcultures and Hybridity
  • Patterns and Trends of Youth Deviance
  • Functionalist Explanations of Youth Deviance
  • New Right and Marxist Explanations of Youth Deviance
  • Left Realist and Interactionist Explanations of Youth Deviance
  • Social Class as an Explanation for Youth Deviance
  • Gangs
  • Anti-School Subcultures
  • Gender and Ethnicity as Explanations for Youth Deviance
  • The Media and Youth Deviance

Component 2 – Researching and Understanding Social Inequalities

Section A: Research Methods

  • Positivism and Interpretivism
  • Validity, Reliability, Representativeness and Generalisability
  • Stages of and Factors Involved in the Research Process
  • Ethical Factors
  • Aims and Hypotheses
  • Primary and Secondary Data
  • Operationalisation
  • Pilot Studies
  • Quantitative and Qualitative Data
  • Data Collection, Respondent Validation
  • Longitudinal Studies

This term begins with the final section of Component 1 – Youth Subcultures. This option has been chosen as the other two options – Family and Media – were a greater focus in the GCSE course. Few of the students will have studied youth subcultures at great depth, so this is a new and engaging topic for the entire cohort. By exploring the emergence of youth culture, student consider their own place in society and how they identify differently from older generations. In this option, students begin to develop a detailed understanding of the large sociological theories (i.e. Functionalism) that will underpin the rest of the course. Oracy skills are also focused on in this unit. Students prepare and present a case study of a specific youth subculture (e.g. punks, goths, skinheads, emos) and develop fact sheets the group includes in their revision notes. Both silent and open debates are introduced here, with students crafting arguments related to the views of the different theories. Students’ own perception of where they stand on these theories begins to evolve here. Many initially advocate for the Marxist perspective, only to alter their views as they learn more about Marxism in the second year of the course.

Key terminology continues to be used and developed in this section (e.g. hybridity and labelling), whilst contemporary examples of specific youth subcultures such as club culture and gangs are engaging and in some cases personally relatable to students. The role of the media in society’s perception of youth culture is investigated, with students developing a critical view of how the media can shape public opinion.

 

In the second part of this term, students begin Component 2 with the study of research methodology used in sociology. Students who took GCSE Sociology will be familiar with many of the key concepts in this section and so are able to contribute positively to initial work and group discussions, benefitting all in the group. Students begin their learning in this topic through a case study of an actual piece of research completed by a PhD student in California. As the students learn about the process of developing and carrying out research, they develop proposals for each section of this research, are then given the actual outcome, and finish each section by critiquing that outcome. This allows students to learn research skills in an engaging and practical way.

 

 

 

 

 

Topic Assessments on:

-reasons for the growth of youth culture

-characteristics of spectacular subcultures

-youth deviance and class/gender

 

-questionnaires

 

End of Half Term 2 Test on Research Methods

 

 

2 Research Methods Skills Builders

 

 

 

Mock Exam – Full Component 1 Paper

 

 

3

Continuation of Component 2

Section A: Research Methods

  • How Data is Interpreted
  • The Relationship Between Sociology and Social Policy
  • Sampling, Access and Gatekeeping
  • Quantitative Research Methods – Questionnaires, Structured Interviews, Focus Groups
  • Official and Non-Official Statistics
  • Qualitative Research Methods – Observations, Content Analysis, Ethnography
  • Mixed Methods

 

Section B: Understanding Social Inequalities

  • Defining and Measuring Social Class
  • Patterns and Trends in Social Class Inequality, focusing on Inequalities in Work and Employment
  • Explanations of Social Class Inequalities: Functionalist, Marxist

 

In the first half of this term, students continue their study of research methods by applying their developing research skills. This consists of a number of mini-studies – e.g. small questionnaires and observations the students develop, carry out, conclude, and analyse. This allows them to carefully consider the potential practical, ethical and theoretical issues of each type of research method in a hands-on way.

Students also carry out a series of focus groups; students who volunteer identify a topic of interest, develop a set of questions for the discussion, randomly choose their focus group from the other students in the class, carry out this focus group, and present their findings and conclusions to the whole class. This process is engaging, allows students to actively discuss a contemporary sociological topic that interests them, and gives them the opportunity to critique this method using their knowledge from the course.

 

In the second half of this term, students begin Section B of Component 2 – Understanding Social Inequalities. Students who have taken GCSE Sociology will have some background for this section because of their study of stratification. This unit begins with students playing a game of monopoly that has been “rigged” with various levels of inequality given to the players predicting the outcome. This results in a lively discussion of the lack of fairness within capitalistic societies. With this real-life context established, students begin to explore the patterns and trends in deprivation, unemployment, and social mobility. The concept of social mobility becomes a strong talking point throughout this unit, with students’ perceptions of the level of social mobility in the UK changing as they investigate these topics further. The key sociological theories are again put into play; as the students now have a solid understanding of these theories from Component 1, they can confidently apply them as explanations of societal inequalities.

 

 

 

Topic Assessments on

-official statistics

-mixed methods

-gender inequality

 

Research Projects – mini studies and focus groups

 

Bridging Work

13

1

 Completion of Component 2

Section B: Understanding Social Inequalities

  • Explanation of Social Class Inequalities: Weberism, Feminism, New Right
  • Patterns, Trends and Explanations of Gender Inequalities: Functionalist, Marxist, Weberism, Feminism, New Right
  • Patterns, Trends and Explanations of Ethnic Inequalities: Functionalism, Marxism, Weberism, Feminism, New Right
  • Patterns, Trend and Explanations of Age Inequality: Functionalism, Marxism, Weberism, Interactionism, Postmodernism

 

Component 3 – Debates in Contemporary Society

Section A: Globalisation and the Digital World

  • Development in Digital Forms of Communication
  • The Networked Global Society and Media Convergence
  • Social Media, Virtual Communities, Digital Social Networks, Big Digital Data
  • Theoretical Views of Digital Forms of Communication: Marxism, Feminism, Postmodernism
  • The Impact of Digital Forms of Communication on Identity
  • The Impact of Digital Forms of Communication on Social Inequalities
  • The Impact of Digital Forms of Communication on Relationships
  • The Impact of Digital Forms of Communication on Cultural Conflict and Change

From September, students continue their exploration of social inequalities. Key areas of inequality include racism, sexism and ageism. Students learn about the levels of child poverty in the UK, fuel poverty amongst the elderly, and consider the impact poverty has particularly on women. These topics are often very personal to students as they consider their own experiences and those of their families, friends and neigbourhoods.  The challenges facing women within the workforce (e.g. horizontal and vertical segregation, ageism) are carefully considered as are solutions to this. Students consider their own intended career paths within this section, such as looking at schemes promoting women in engineering. Contemporary examples of families in poverty are use throughout the course, with students engaging in discussions on relevant topics such as rental evictions, the benefits system, and young carers.

 

In the second half of this term, students begin Component 3, Section A: Globalisation and the Digital World. This unit gives students the opportunity to consider the impact of globalisation and new digital technologies on society – both positive and negative. The unit begins with a debate as to whether globalisation is a positive or negative force.  Students consider their own use of digital technology, investigating how many hours they are on their mobile phones for example, how they use their technology (communication, entertainment, academic) and how technology can both benefit and potentially harm their relationships and opportunities. In this section, student learn more about how technology is used at a larger level – by corporations and governments. They investigate contemporary examples of the Snowden Report, Wikileaks, and the gathering of personal data by large media corporations such as Facebook. They discuss the ramifications of this and the Government’s right to have this data.

 

Students also explore the use of technology to create and alter identity, from Facebook as autobiography, to women and other subjugated groups using technology to have a voice. Relevant issues as to the use of technology continue to be discussed, from the digital divide in terms of poverty and age to using new media to form friendships, romantic relationships, and professional partnerships. Students again consider their own use of technology, now focusing on how they may use digital media in positive ways to create their own professional profile, connect to potential jobs, and explore career and training options. The idea of the digital footprint is also investigated, with students learning about the importance of privacy settings and keeping their online data safe.

 

 

Topic Assessments on:

-class inequality

-age inequality

-the global village

-the impact of digital communication on women’s identity

-the impact of digital communication on relationships

 

 

2

Continuation of Component 3 –

Section A: Globalisation and the Digital World

  • The Impact of Digital Forms of Communication on Cultural Defence

 

Section B Option 1 – Crime and Deviance

  • How Crime and Deviance are Measured
  • Patterns and Trends in Crime in Terms of: Social Class, Gender, Age
  • Global and Green Crime
  • Theoretical Views of Crime and Deviance: Functionalism, Marxism, Neo-Marxism, Interactionism, New Right, Subcultural Theories, Feminism, Realism (left and right)

In the first part of this term, In the last topics of this unit, students consider the use of digital media by larger groups to challenge governments, protest, and protect their cultures and environments. Key contemporary examples include the Arab Spring and Standing Rock. Students consider the usefulness of online movements and how digital media has been used to positively and negatively impact these large scale changes.

 

In the second half of this term, students begin the final section of this course – Crime and Deviance. This option has been chosen because of it is engaging and of interest to the majority of the students. If they have taken GCSE Sociology, the students will have a solid base to begin this section. The first topic will be introduced within a context new to all of the students – The British Crime Survey. Students complete a small-scale investigation of this survey, including looking at recent recorded crimes within their own post codes. This activity allows those students who did take GCSE Sociology an opportunity to apply their knowledge to a real life relevant setting whilst giving students with the GCSE background to establish a solid understanding of such basic concepts as the “dark figure of crime”. This project acts as a base for the first topics in this unit – how crime and deviance are measured, the usefulness of police statistics, and patterns and trends of crime related to demography. Students use their previous knowledge of the media’s influence to critically consider the reporting of crime; they also connect back to their research methods skills by completing a meta-analysis of crimes reported in various newspapers. This allows students to reflect on their own initial beliefs regarding what crimes are actually more common in the UK, and who commits them.

Key sociological theories are again applied here; students now have a very strong understanding of each theory and are able to confidently explain crime and deviance from each theory’s perspective.

 

When exploring global and green crime, students often engage in rich discussion. They compare various levels of crime such as benefits fraud to tax evasion and large scale corporate pollution. Contemporary examples such as Bernie Madoff’s Ponzi scheme or the current fraud case against Theranos’s founder Ellizabeth Holmes. These cases tend to challenge students’ views on crime being limited to street crime and youth or working class deviance. 

 

Topic Assessments on:

-the usefulness of police statistics

-the relationship between class and crime

 

 

Mock Exam – Full Component 2

 

 

 

3

Completion of Component – Debates in Contemporary Society

Section B Option 1 – Crime and Deviance

  • Left Wing Solutions to Crime
  • Right Wing Solutions to Crime

In this final term, students complete their exploration of causes of crime and focus on solutions to crime. They consider both right and left wing solutions, engaging in debates that deepen their understanding of the political spectrum. Solutions such as surveillance and retributive punishment are compared to the ideas of positive policing and restorative justice. Students investigate well known case studies such as the application of the Broken Windows theory in New York City and the increased use of camera surveillance in the UK.  Students then develop public policy proposals for reducing crime in Liverpool and the UK using their knowledge of these two very different approaches. The proposals are considered and critiqued using a silent debate. This allows students to complete the course by applying their understanding of sociology to a real life problem in society; this connects to the core element of this course – understanding society in order to make it a better place for the people who live in it.

 

Mock Exam – Full Component  2

Topic Assessments on:

-realist explanations of crime

 

Mock Exam – Full Component 3

Mock Exam – Full Component 1