History

Intent

Year 7 begins with building on knowledge and competences introduced in KS1 and KS2, to further embed and deepen historical context and crucial skills including chronology and the use and importance of primary and secondary sources.  These skills are then put to the test in The Invaders topic, completing a study which consolidates and extends pupils’ chronological knowledge of Britain pre 1066.  The Iron Age, as well as the Roman, Saxon and Viking invasions are evaluated, challenging pupils to investigate why people chose to invade Britain and the evidence they have left behind, still in use today.  Pupils then assess the importance of these invasions in British history pre 1066 and hereafter.  This naturally leads on to the Middle Ages topic.  This encompasses the battle for the throne in 1066 and the repercussions of this, as well as looking at the importance of religion at this time and the development of the church, state and society.  Pupils get the chance to examine a different way of life through a range of sources; interpreting, analysing and gaging their usefulness, deepening their knowledge and understanding of not only the particular event, but how historical sources can come with a certain amount of bias. A thematic study across KS3 is that of health through time, the Black Death allows pupils to come to reasoned and justified conclusions on the causes and consequences of this.  The development of the church, state and society introduced in the Middle Ages topic is taken a step further with the next topic, The Power of the Church and Crown.  This topic focuses specifically on the impact and sequence of events surrounding Henry VIII. Which opens the opportunity for discussion on the religious rollercoaster between Henry VIII and the stability brought about by Elizabeth I.  Next comes an in-depth study of Elizabeth I.  This allows pupils the opportunity to use their Historical skills in the interpretation of a range of sources and be able to put forward reasoned arguments about the reign of Elizabeth.  This unit also allows further development of context and perspective in relation to changes in politics, religion and society as a whole. The end of Year 7 culminates in a study of the Industrial Revolution.  This instinctively offers a summary of previous learnt knowledge as its focus is on the concepts of idea, political power, industry and empire of Britain.  Pupils will explore the improvements in technology and assess their importance at that time and their benefits still for today.  They will also see how society had changed and the improvements to health care which led to a population explosion.

Year 8 begins with an investigation into British Empire.  Pupils start to formulate reasoned questions regarding the reasons why Britain would want to expand her Empire and the impacts of this e.g. Why do so many countries speak English? This study also opens up the opportunity to expand their culture capital by having a moral debate about the British Empire – weighing up the pros and cons and its impact on society then and now. This naturally leads on to the Slave Trade topic.  Pupils gain an understanding of the misconceptions white people had of African people – they will examine a number of sources, discussing the context of the source and the bias that may come along with it.  Pupils deepen and embed their knowledge and understanding of the Triangle of Trade, with a particular focus on the Middle Passage.  At this point pupils are encouraged to develop their narrative skills, based on a number of media resources about the Middle Passage, and reflect on the conditions of the slave journey.   Once shores of the Caribbean and southern American states were in sight conditions on the boats changed, slaves were fed and washed down with lemon juice and painted with gun powder, pupils are asked to investigate why this would happen.  Life on the plantations is then looked at and the concept of bias is once again discussed.  The abolition of the slave trade and the role Liverpool played in the slave trade are examined and pupils complete a local study of it.  The end of the slave trade marked the idea of slaves were now free but black people continued to be treated as inferior.  This leads on to the topic of Civils Rights and in particular the Civil Rights Movement in the USA.  Pupils look at the Jim Crow laws and how this led to many deaths, riots and protests.  The murder of Emmett Till, the Montgomery Bus Boycott, Martin Luther King Jnr. and Malcom X are all studied, and their significance determined based on reasoned conclusions drawn from a variety of sources.  The study of Britain at War is now undertaken.  Pupils look at both the short- and long-term causes of the war.  Propaganda, letters from the trenches and eyewitness accounts allow pupils to discuss the impact of war on people fighting it on foreign soil, those left behind and the state.  The Treaty of Versailles and the end of WW1 lay the foundations for the movement on to the expansion into WWII.  Hitler and his rise to power is considered, making connections with previous learnt knowledge regarding Germany’s outcome in the Treaty of Versailles and why the Great War was the not the War to end all Wars.  The rise of the Nazi party and the idea of a superior race over other inferior races is introduced.  This is a concept already examined when looking at racial inequality during the Empire, Slave Trade and Civil Rights Movement topics.  This idea of superiority is directly related to the last topic of Year 8, the Holocaust.  Pupils will understand the term Holocaust and will know the groups of people deemed as inferior by the Nazi’s.  Pupils will undertake investigations into real life accounts of the Holocaust through diary entries, video clips and interviews with Holocaust survivors.  Pupils will see and process the horrors of the Holocaust and gain and understanding of why it is so important to remember this part of history.  An in-depth study of Auschwitz will put the pupils learnt knowledge into context.  The final unit of Year 8 focuses on studying in-depth a range of dictators from different points in the 20th Century e.g. Stalin, Hitler and Saddam Hussein pulling together skills and knowledge acquired across the Key Stage learning to understand further how we can learn lessons for our future from our past.

Cultural capital opportunities in Key Stage 3 History are varied and integrated into the learning as pupils gain a deeper understanding of our history, but specifically pupils have the opportunity to visit the locality of the school from a historical perspective to understand more about the importance of history in this area, as well as a visit to the Slavery Museum located in Liverpool’s International Maritime Museum where pupils investigate in more detail the role Liverpool played in the Slave Trade for the local history project, and how the abolition of slavery led to the beginnings of the civil rights movement.

Implementation:

Year

Term

Topic

Knowledge, skills and understanding

Window for Assessment

7

1

The Invaders pre-1066

Pupils will:

Extend and deepen their contextual knowledge and understanding of the history of Britain as a chronological narrative that focuses on the changing social history and understanding of medicine in Britain pre-1066.

Study how people lived and how health and medicine in societies from the Iron Age, Romans, Saxons and Vikings changed over time to aid critical understanding of skills including analysing similarities, differences and significance.

October 2020

 

1-2

Living, Working and Dying in the Middle Ages 1066-1509

Pupils will:

Gain an in-depth knowledge and understanding of the church, state and society 1066-1509 by studying how these developed chronologically and how interdependence between factors led to developments in the ways society operated.

Study key events and features of Britain including The Battle of Hastings; The Norman Conquest; society, economy and culture in Medieval Britain (e.g. feudalism, development of towns); the health theme via the Black Death and its social and economic impact.

Use a range of historical skills of enquiry, such as source and interpretation-based studies, similarities, differences, significance, cause and consequence, continuity and change to create structured accounts and analyses.

December 2020, February 2021

 

2-3

The Power of the Church and The Crown 1509-1745

Pupils will:

Gain an in-depth knowledge and understanding of the development of Church, state and society within this time period, but with recall and application of knowledge and understanding from the previous time period as well.

Study key events and features of Britain including Henry VIII and the Reformation; Edward VI and his changes to the church and Elizabeth I and the religious settlement and conflict with Catholics.  Additionally, the breadth theme of health through time will continue by investigating medicine in the Elizabethan era.

Use a range of historical skills of enquiry, such as source and interpretation-based studies, similarities, differences, significance, cause and consequence, continuity and change to create structured accounts and analyses.

March and May 2021

 

3

The Industrial Revolution 1745-1901

Pupils will:

Gain an in-depth knowledge and understanding of the development of ideas, political power and industry.  This will be addressed through the study of how Britain became the first industrial nations, including the impacts this had on society (e.g. population explosion, growth of towns and cities, factory conditions) and the textile innovations that took place to lead Britain to be at the forefront of the Industrial Revolution in terms of political power as well.

Continue to study how health and medicine developed over time via an investigation into the health of workers during the Industrial Revolution.

Use a range of historical skills of enquiry, such as source and interpretation-based studies, similarities, differences, significance, cause and consequence, continuity and change to create structured accounts and analyses.

July 2021

8

1

British Empire and the local study; Liverpool and The Slave Trade

Pupils will:

Gain an in-depth knowledge and understanding of the development of the British Empire – how it was created and how we benefitted from the rule of colonial nations such as India. This is then followed by a project-based investigation into Britain’s role in the Slave Trade; the Middle Passage; Life on the Plantations and explicitly researched examples of how this related to Liverpool as the local study – a depth study covering what role did Liverpool play and how did it benefit from the trade?

Use a range of historical skills of enquiry, such as source and interpretation-based studies, similarities, differences, significance, cause and consequence, continuity and change to create structured accounts and analyses.

October 2020

 

1-2

Civil Rights Movement

Pupils will:

Gain an in-depth knowledge and understanding of this significant issue in world history and its interconnections with other world developments – how did the USA Civil Rights Movement in the 20th Century impact on life in the USA, but also life in the UK for ethnic minorities in our society?

Aspects studied by pupils to gain a mastery understanding of this issue include The American Civil War and Emancipation; Jim Crow Laws; the Ku Klux Klan, Martin Luther-King; Malcom X and Black Power before reflecting on where the civil rights movement has left all Americans in society today and how this has impacts on civil rights in the UK as well.

Use a range of historical skills of enquiry, such as source and interpretation-based studies, similarities, differences, significance, cause and consequence, continuity and change to create structured accounts and analyses.

December 2020, January 2021


 

2-3

WWI, WWII and The Holocaust

Pupils will:

Deepen their knowledge and understanding of the challenges faced by Britain, Europe and the wider world during these time periods.  The studies will include developing further understanding of the events and concepts that led to these challenges by covering: the causes of WWI; government control and propaganda; soldiers’ experiences of war; British society during WW;, remembering WWI and interpretations linked to it; the inter-war years allowing the rise of Hitler and the causes of WWII; the experiences of British society during WWII; key events and battles during WWII e.g. D-Day; Historic anti-Semitism; persecution of Jews and other minority groups targeted; conditions in the ghettos, life in Auschwitz; who was to blame for the Holocaust and how should the Holocaust be remembered?

Gain further understanding of the KS3 breadth study addressing health through time via a focus on medicine/health during the wars and events of Th Holocaust.

Use a range of historical skills of enquiry, such as source and interpretation-based studies, similarities, differences, significance, cause and consequence, continuity and change to create structured accounts and analyses.

March and May 2021

 

3

20th Century Dictators

Pupils will:

Gain an in-depth knowledge and understanding of the challenges that dictators have presented to a variety of countries across the world in the 20th Century and how this has led to impacts upon society in the wider world as well as Britain’s role in tackling the problems.

Study a range of examples to understand how the rise of dictators can occur and the impacts they can cause, such as: Joseph Stalin in Russia; Adolf Hitler and the Nazi Party; Mussolini and the Fascist Party; Saddam Hussein and crimes against humanity and Britain and the Iraq War – our leaders and their role in whether the war was a crime or not?

Use a range of historical skills of enquiry, such as source and interpretation-based studies, similarities, differences, significance, cause and consequence, continuity and change to create structured accounts and analyses.

May 2021

Where KS3 classes are taught between two teaching staff the order of the units will differ in order to allow for two units to be taught concurrently, but this will be planned to still allow for the sequencing of the curriculum to maximise opportunities for recall and building a competence in chronological understanding across the KS3 provision, in order for the curriculum to be ambitious and create a fluency in the learning pupils experience.

KS4 Intent:

As pupils complete the Year 7 and 8 Schemes of Work in History they will have had full and in-depth coverage of the National Curriculum requirements for Key Stage 3.  This means that pupils entering Year 9 will have enhancements and gain a mastery learning of History through the ‘Global Citizenship’ programme, but those that continue to study History for Key Stage 4 will build on and develop their knowledge, skills and understanding in a range of areas of History as well as being able to gain in-depth knowledge, understanding and skills in a range of new areas as well, all enabling pupils to become highly competent Historians as a result of the teachers having a high ambition for pupils and themselves, as well as pupils having access to the full Key Stage 4 provision and more.

Year 9 in History starts with building on prior knowledge, understanding and skills from Key Stage 3, but focusing on how Britain developed in the 20th Century in terms of its living conditions, society and democracy with a specific focus on the suffragette movement. This unit of work enhances the learning of Key Stage 4 in terms of developing contextual understanding of British history, but also develops and embeds key skills for our pupils to become critical historians; overall setting pupils up well for successfully studying History at Key Stage 4.  The next unit of work studied by pupils also has direct links to learning at Key Stage 3.  Pupils work their way through the unit focusing on Health and the People over a 1000-year period.  This is a breadth study at Key Stage 4, but also with a number of depth points within it – it builds on a develops at a greater depth the learning from the medicine through time links weaved into the Key Stage 3 curriculum.  Pupils gain a greater understanding of chronology by studying the breadth study at this point in the Key Stage 4 course – the overview of key events in medicine, right up to modern medicine, ensures that pupils have a chronological grasp of history on which to base their future studies.  Cultural Capital is enhanced further in this by visiting the Thackray Medical Museum in Leeds where so much of the history studied is brought to life to enhance interest and understanding. 

In the latter part of Year 9 the next main unit of work focuses on Germany as a democracy and dictatorship between the years of 1890-1945.  This unit builds upon the knowledge and understanding gained of WWI and WWII in Key Stage 3 by expanding it to investigate the wider historical context.  The rule of Kaiser Wilhelm through to the rise of Hitler has so many important factors to understand in order to enhance understanding of the time periods and this is focused on in detail so that pupils have a mastery understanding of the significance of events and factors at play during this season of human history.  This unit is completed in Year 10, from where studies shift to focus on conflict and tension in the inter-war years (1918-1939).  This unit of work is studied because it has so many intertwined links with the Germany unit of work – pupils have a contextual understanding already of the events that took place at that time so the focus in teaching and learning can be on fully developing their understanding of the political events and factors that occurred off the back of WWI and leading into the creation of WWII.  The contextual basis allows studies to focus on allowing pupils to gain a mastery understanding and application of knowledge through this unit of work so that both units can be enhanced by the other.

Into Year 11, the study focus shifts to be on the final unit of work for GCSE – a period depth study focusing on 35 years of Elizabeth I’s reign.  This once again links back to Key Stage 3 learning, embedding and recalling knowledge and understanding already gained, but creating deeper understanding of this period in history for pupils.  The depth study critically investigates the rule of Elizabeth, society in her time period and troubles experienced at home and abroad so that pupils have a confidence in understanding the events and the evidence for these events.  The final section of the unit is a study of a historic site, and this changes each year to provide variety and further cultural capital enhancements as we always try to visit the historic sites if distance and costs allow (e.g. Hardwick Hall was visited, and Kenilworth Castle will be next year). This explains why we study this unit last in the order of the Key Stage 4 – so that the historic site visit can be as close to final assessment points as possible, therefore providing the maximum enhancements to the depth of understanding gained.

All of these details explained here allow for us to be certain that pupils completing Key Stage 4 History at St. Julie’s will leave having had the opportunities they are entitled to; for curriculum breadth and depth of understanding to have been acquired and utilised in ways which prepare them for life-long learning outside the classroom.

Implementation:

Year

Term

Topic

Knowledge, skills and understanding

Window for Assessment

9

1

Development of Victorian Britain, Democracy and Women’s Suffrage

Pupils will:

Deepen their knowledge and understanding of key KS3 20th Century learning to provide a contextual basis for the learning at KS4. Through this unit of work pupils will study the societal features of Britain in the 20th Century and how this led to the rise of discontent amongst women at the way democracy functioned in Britain at the turn of the 20th Century.

Use a range of historical skills that they are familiar with from KS3, but also increasing the complexity with which they are used and understood in order to provide an effective skill base for KS4 History.  These include skills of enquiry, such as source and interpretation-based studies, similarities, differences, significance, cause and consequence, continuity and change to create structured accounts and analyses.

September and October 2020

 

1-3

Britain: Health and the People c1000-present day

Pupils will:

Deepen their knowledge and understanding of how medicine and public health developed in Britain over 1000-year period as a thematic breadth study.  This will build on and help pupils to apply their knowledge and understanding from KS3.  It will focus on Britain primarily, but will also give pupils the opportunity to study the wider world interconnectedness provided by the development of medicine over time.

Study the importance and gain understanding of the factors that worked individually and together to create change at different rates, why it changed, whether change brought progress and the significance of the changes as well as the causes and consequences of changes.  The factors covered will focus on: war: superstition and religion; chance; government; communication; science and technology; the role of the individual in encouraging or inhibiting change.  The usefulness of sources is a further skill that will be further developed and embedded.

Study four key areas to gain the knowledge, understanding and skills required from this unit of work:

  1. Medicine stands still
  2. The beginnings of change
  3. A revolution in medicine
  4. Modern medicine

November and December 2020, February, March, April and May 2021

 

3

Germany, 1890-1945: Democracy and dictatorship

Pupils will:

Deepen their knowledge and understanding of the development and collapse of democracy and the rise and fall of Nazism in aiding pupils to gain a mastery understanding of the political, economic, social and cultural aspects of these two developments and the role ideas played in influencing change  They will also look at the role of key individuals and groups in shaping change and the impact the developments had on them. 

Study three key areas of this part of history:

  1. Germany and the growth of democracy
  2. Germany and the Depression
  3. The experiences of Germans under the Nazis

Develop their historical skills to be able to explain in extended written format the following key areas from this unit of work: how interpretations differ; why interpretations differ; how convincing interpretations are; to be able to describe; to be able to explain ‘in what ways’; and to write essay answers in section format. They will also be able to develop ways of sustaining a judgement and lines of reasoning as well as being able to use second order concepts as well.

June and July 2021

10

1-2

October, November, December 2020, January, February 2021

 

2-3

Conflict and Tension – the Inter-War Years 1918-1939

Pupils will:

Deepen their knowledge and understanding of the complex and diverse interest of different individuals and states including the Great Powers that existed during this time period.  Pupils will gain understanding about key concepts such as self-determinations, ideas of internationalism and the challenges of revision the peace settlement. 

Study the causes of WWII; why it couldn’t be avoided and who the key individuals were that shaped the changes that took place between the two wars.

Study three key areas of this part of history:

  1. Peacemaking
  2. The League of Nations and international peace
  3. The origins and outbreak of WWII

Develop their historical skills to be able to explain in extended written format the following key areas from this unit of work: source analysis; how useful sources are; to be able to write an account and write extended essays about how far they agree with statements given.  Pupils will also be able to analyse second order concepts of cause and consequence as well as constructing a sustained line of reasoning to create an informed and evidenced judgement.

March, May, June and July 2021

11

1

October 2020

 

1-3

Elizabethan England c1568-1603

Pupils will:

Deepen their knowledge and understanding of the last 35 years of Elizabeth I’s reign, focusing on major events from an economic, religious, political, social and cultural standpoints as well as arising contemporary and historical controversies.

Study four key areas of this part of history:

  1. Elizabeth’s court and Parliament
  2. Life in Elizabethan times
  3. Troubles at home and abroad
  4. The historic environment of Elizabethan England

Develop their historical skills to be able to explain in extended written format the following key areas from this unit of work: how far they agree with given statements; be able to explain; write an account about a given situation; essay questions linked to a historic site studied.  Pupils will also be able to utilise and extend their skills of analysing historical events and second order concepts of causation, change, continuity and consequence as well as creating sustained lines of reasoning and evidenced judgements.

November, December 2020, January, February and March 2021

 

2-3

Becoming a critical Historian

Pupils will:

Extend, embed and consolidate their learning from across KS4 by applying their knowledge, understanding and skills to improve their capacity to be critical historians.  This is designed to ensure pupils finish KS4 being confident and capable historians.

May 2021

 

KS5 Intent:

Year 12 History begins with split focus on Democracy and Dictatorship, a depth and breadth study.  Students will study both Germany and West Germany 1919-89 and The Rise and Fall of Fascism 1911-46.  Students begin with these topics to allow them to gain a greater knowledge and understanding into key events, politics and changes to the economy, society and culture in both Germany and Italy throughout the directed time periods.  Students begin their Germany studies examining the changes to politics and government, this allows for students to reflect on prior Key Stage 4 knowledge (acknowledging Weimar Germany, Post WW1, Nazi Germany and Post WW2) but to also gain a more in depth understanding of the History of both countries.  Students then advance to studying the opposition to policies, how these were controlled and the acceptance of policies throughout the same time periods, this creates a clear flow, as not only are they able to reflect and subconsciously recap their understanding of changes to both politics and government, they are also able to develop a rounded understanding to events that shaped Germany and the wider world. Theme three places emphasis on the economic situation in Germany from 1918-89, this will again allow for students to reflect on previous knowledge attained from Key Stage 4.  Gaining a knowledge of economy allows for a clear flow to theme four, which places a focus on aspects of life in Germany and West Germany.  This allows for students to gain a deeper understanding of society within Germany and West Germany (1918-89) whilst also reflecting on the economic policies that impacted on the people of Germany including children, women, and minorities.  Students complete the Germany and West Germany topic with a focus on historical interpretations; the rationale behind this being that students will be able to draw on knowledge covered in themes one-four to develop their levels of analysis.  Alongside their studied of Germany, students also study the history of Italy 1911-46 with a second teacher.  Students begin their studies of Italy by gaining an in-depth knowledge and understanding of the Liberal State within Italy (1911-18) this allows for students to form a foundation knowledge of what life was like within Italy (including the economy, society and culture) before they develop their understanding of Fascism.  Students then move to gaining an understanding of who Mussolini was, this allows for students to draw on previous knowledge and reflect on how the failure to establish a stable Italy with a focus on democracy allowed for both Mussolini and fascism to arise.  Students will spend time developing their knowledge of fascism, what this meant for the people, the economic impacts and the wider events surrounding it with a directed focus on the changes between 1919-1926.  This then allows for students to develop their understanding of fascism when they begin to study Italy as a Fascist state (1925-1940) this will allow for students to gain an understanding of the shift in culture within Italy whilst gaining a more in depth understanding of the changes in politics and the development of a dictatorship.  After gaining a solid understanding of Fascism, the course moves to place focus on challenges to, and the fall of, the fascist state, c1935-1946.  The rationale behind this unit of work as a depth study allows for a clear understanding of the issues within Italy that allowed for a shift in politics with a jump to fascism, before studying a return to democracy in the aftermath of WWII.  Although both aspects of the Year 12 course focus on two different geographical locations within Europe, both topics draw strong links that allow for students to develop a strong and clear knowledge of democracy and dictatorship within Europe.

Year 13 allows for students to conduct a non-examined piece of coursework.  The rationale for completing this in Year 13 is it allows for students to reflect on their previous knowledge attained through studies centred around Germany and West Germany.  The coursework places focus on the Holocaust whilst also linking in wider knowledge allowing for students to demonstrate their wider contextual knowledge.  The aim is for students to develop skills in the analysis and evaluation of interpretations of history independently by focusing on the work three historians in relation to the set question addressed (this again links with former skills covered within Year 12).  Students will spend time within lessons recapping the Holocaust and developing their understanding of the content before they begin to analyse different interpretations.  This will allow for students to develop their skills before they begin to conduct their coursework.  Students will be allocated lesson time to complete their work and will be instructed on various submission dates for drafts and final submissions.  Also during Year 13 students will study Poverty, public health and the state in Britain, c1780-1939. This will allow for students to further reflect from knowledge attained at Key Stage 4 (Britain health and the people paper) students will gain both an overview of the breadth themes as well as the in-depth study areas, in order for understanding to be fully developed and applied in a variety of contexts to enable critical historical thinking to be evident.  Students begin by studying two key themes in breadth focused around lives in peril and the health of the nation (1780-1939).  Students will firstly develop a knowledge of the impetus for public reforms before drawing on changes in public health.  This will allow for a developed knowledge of how the British state gradually became involved in taking on responsibility for people’s health and welfare.  Students will also study five key themes in depth drawing links to poverty, people and the law. The five themes follow a chronological order to allow for a clear flow, students being by studying paupers and pauperism, 1780-1832, this will allow for a more rounded knowledge to be gained of society and culture at this time in British History before students begin to look at initial intervention from the government through examining the Poor Law Amendment Act and its impact, 1832-1847 and the role of the government, self-help and charity, 1847-1880.  Through gaining knowledge about the situation within Britain and the problems facing government, theme three places emphasis on pressure and action between 1880-1914.  This will allow students to reflect on prior knowledge and develop their understanding before drawing on the final theme; depression and the dole: poverty in the inter-war years, 1920-1939.  The rationale in place for following the structure is that students will develop skills that allow them to analyse and evaluate sources in context, and to create understanding of the long-term changes in the breadth aspects of the study.

The whole of the Key Stage 5 course in History is designed to be highly ambitious and provide students with an understanding of history to which they are entitled in order to progress in their future studies and employment.  Cultural capital experiences are embedded where contextual opportunities arise – particularly where visits are possible e.g. the voices of Auschwitz project in Poland and the Thackray Museum of Medicine in Leeds.

Implementation:

Year

Term

Topic

Knowledge, skills and understanding

Window for Assessment

12

1-3

Germany and West Germany 1918-89

Students will:

Study this unit of work as a breadth unit – gaining knowledge and understanding about key political changes experienced in a unified Germany and then in West Germany after WWII, and how these changes impacted on German economic, social and cultural developments.

Study four key themes to gain the knowledge and understanding and develop the necessary skills to analyse and create sustained judgements and evaluations:

  1. Political and governmental change, 1918-1989
  2. Opposition, control and consent, 1918-1989
  3. Economic development and policies, 1918-1989
  4. Aspects of life in Germany and West Germany, 1918-1989

Complete a depth study of historical interpretations on a broad question, which is contextualised by, and runs parallel to, the themes: how far Hitler’s foreign policy was responsible for WWII.

Approximately monthly throughout the unit

 

1-3

The rise and fall of fascism in Italy c1911-46

Students will:

Study this unit of work as a depth study, focusing on the turbulent years in Italy that saw the collapse of the liberal state, the creation of a fascist dictatorship and a return to democracy in the aftermath of WWII.

Gain and in-depth understanding of the extent and nature of the profound political, economic and social changes experienced by the Italian people in the year c1922-1946 and how the failure to create a stable, democratic Italian state in the early 20th Century led to the rise of a new political ideology and a personal dictatorship.

Study four key topics to gain the in-depth knowledge and understanding, as well as being able to apply this in a range of situations to become critical historians that can sustain reasoned judgements and evaluations in extended essay writing situations:

  1. The liberal state, c1911-1918
  2. The rise of Mussolini and the creation of a fascist dictatorship 1919-1926
  3. The fascist state, 1925-1940
  4. Challenges to, and the fall of, the fascist state, c1935-1946

Approximately monthly throughout the unit

 

3

Poverty, public health and the state in Britain, c1780-1939

Students will:

Gain both an overview of the breath themes as well as the in-depth study areas as well, in order for understanding to be fully developed and applied in a variety of contexts to enable critical historical thinking to be evident.

Study how the British state gradually became involved in taking on responsibility for people’s health and welfare. This happened in reaction to a rapidly industrialising society, where thousands of people lived out their domestic and working lives in close proximity,  The scale of the problem posed a question that is still asked today: where does responsibility for health and welfare lie – with the individual or with society?

Study two key themes in breadth – lives in peril – the health of the nation (c1780-1939):

  1. The impetus for public health reforms
  2. Changes in public health

Study five key themes in depth – poverty, people and the law:

  1. Paupers and pauperism, 1780-1832
  2. Less eligibility: the Poor Law Amendment Act and its impact, 1832-1847
  3. The government, self-help and charity, 1847-1880
  4. Social and welfare reforms: pressure and action, 1880-1914
  5. Depression and the dole: poverty in the inter-war years, 1920-1939

Develop skills that allow them to analyse and evaluate sources in context, and to create understanding of the long-term changes in the breadth aspects of the study.

Approximately monthly throughout the unit

13

1-3

 

1-3

Non-Examined Assessment (Coursework)

Students will complete a non-examined piece of coursework which is linked to the studies students complete around The Holocaust to provide contextual knowledge and understanding from prior learning and from the Germany/West-Germany unit study.

The aim is for students to develop skills in the analysis and evaluation of interpretations of history independently by focusing on the work three historians in relation to the set question addressed.

Students will give their view about a specific issue related to The Holocaust and with reference to three chosen works from their three historians, they will:

  • Analyse the ways in which interpretations of the question, problem or issue differ;
  • Explain the differences they have identified;
  • Evaluate the arguments, indicating which they found most persuasive and explaining their judgements.

Guidance and feedback will be provided in accordance with the regulations provided by Ofqual.