Geography

Intent

Year 7 Map Skills.  This unit is designed to embed, deepen and recall prior learning from KS1 and KS2, whilst developing and progressing new skills e.g. the use of Ordnance Survey maps, field work as a source of contrast e.g. micro-climate of St. Julie’s and a focus on countries and cities in Asia. This allows pupils to develop analytical skills, as well as interpreting maps at various scales and the use of a variety of fieldwork techniques showing the relationship between the human and physical environment.  By deepening pupils understanding of location and analysis, pupils move on to the Extreme Weather topic.  Pupils can correctly locate areas affected by a range of extreme weathers e.g. tropical cyclones and drought based on their prior knowledge of locational Geography (India and China as examples), lines of latitude and location of large bodies of water (the world’s oceans) and their impact on weather patterns. This leads confidently on to the Ice Worlds topic, reiterating the importance of latitude alongside the role of air pressure – high and low pressure - and their impact on our ice worlds.  The idea of physical processes in the formation of our natural landscape is further developed in this topic – the role of erosion and weathering in particular.  This opens-up the potential to investigate the impact of human activity on the physical environment in our world’s polar regions, looking at the impact in the northern areas of Russia (Siberia) and the Arctic in general.  Pupils are introduced to extracts from David Attenborough which embeds their cultural capital.  Having developed and embedded an understanding of physical processes, the Africa topic is now undertaken.  Pupils have a deeper understanding at this point of location and its impact on weather conditions, this then forms the basis and knowledge for the concept of ecosystems which are examined in the Africa unit.  As well as looking at the physical environment of a range of African countries, the human environment is also investigated.  This deepens key skills such as analysis, interpretations of a range of images and maps at various scales e.g. aerial photographs and thematic maps (population) and the ability of pupils to make reasoned and justified conclusions based on complex information provided to them (addressing misconceptions about Africa). The end of Year 7 culminates in the study of Russia, in particular the Asian regions.  Pupils use the skills they have embedded over the course of the year to do an in-depth study of the country and compare characteristics to a region in Africa (Kenya) – showing the stark contrasts between the human and physical environments, but also challenging pupils to investigate the similarities between both regions. This allows pupils to achieve further higher order questioning, a skill that has developed and been nurtured through the course of the year.

Year 8 Environmental Concerns topic.  This follows on naturally from previous study in regards human impacts on the natural environment e.g. Africa, Russia and Extreme Weather. Within this unit pupils will be expected to complete a number of local based field work activities (also providing cultural capital opportunities), creating enquiry questions for these activities, gaining results and using these results to make justified and reasoned conclusions.  This will go alongside theory being taught in lessons – showing theory in practice – which enables further understanding of knowledge as well as giving context to it.  The unit examines both the natural and human causes of climate change, challenging pupils to come to their own conclusion regarding our current climate situation.  This leads on to the Hazardous World topic which gives pupils further insight into the physical processes occurring around the world.  This allows deepening of knowledge and opportunity to recall knowledge from prior learning.  Pupils will focus on tectonics (including geology) as well as coastal and river landscapes.  When examining these concepts, pupils can make links and connections with previous learning from the Environmental Concerns topic e.g. how large volcanic eruptions have caused global cooling, how global warming can cause sea level rise and an increase in storm frequency and intensity.  Based on the physical environment, the human environment can flourish or flounder.  This subsequently impacts on the level of development of a country or region within a country.  The impact of the natural environment as well as the human, opens-up discussion in our Development and Globalisation topic.  Here pupils look at a range of resources including census data as well as thematic maps to determine the level of development of a country.  Money is only one way to measure development so pupils are encouraged to look at other aspects to show it e.g. Human Development Index.  They begin to evaluate these methods and determine their importance in measuring whether a country is developing, emerging or developed. Pupil’s cultural capital is further expanded upon when looking at the sweatshop industry – this opens-up the moral debate of where our clothes and goods come from.  The population of a country and its structure can play a role in a country’s development.  Based on the knowledge gathered in the previous Development topic, the Population Changes topic is undertaken.  Pupils looks at why certain populations grow in certain areas – looking at the human and physical geography of the area.  Here we will look at population specifically in China and its One Child Policy, but will also examine the world’s second largest population, India.  The year ends with an in-depth study of a particular geographic location, in this case the Middle East.  Pupils will use the knowledge gained, deepened and embedded through the course of the year and implement this to this particular region of the world.  They will scrutinise the human and physical environment of this region and determine how one is interdependent on the other.  They will explore the importance of the Middle East in the global context.

Cultural Capital opportunities in Geography have been woven into the curriculum; for instance where pupils learn about different places and cultures as part of their learning; as well as the opportunities for fieldwork in Year 7 and 8 further enhancing cultural capital access as well – a better understanding of the local area in which they are studying.

Implementation:

Year

Term

Topic

Knowledge, skills and understanding

Window for Assessment

7

1

Locational Geography and Geographical Skills

Pupils will:

Develop contextual knowledge of key globally significant places.

Develop contextual knowledge of their local area.

Become competent in utilising maps at different scales (including OS maps), diagrams, photographs and the communication of information through utilising maps and numerical skills.

Become competent at understanding how GIS can be used to enhance our geographical skills and understanding of the world.

October 2020

 

 

 

1

Extreme Weather

Pupils will:

Understand how geographical processes and systems create the weather and climates that are experienced in a wider variety of places across the globe.

Their understanding will cover weather systems; pressure systems; precipitation; hurricanes; tornadoes; thunderstorms and drought.

Place based examples will cover a range of locations at a variety of scales including topical locations in the UK, India, Namibia and the USA and map/photograph interpretation skills will be reinforced through their study.

December 2020

 

2

Ice Worlds

Pupils will:

Understand through detailed map application where glaciated environments exist – this will include deepening understanding about polar deserts. 

Understand, through these detailed place-based studies, how the key physical processes that operate in glaciated landscapes create distinctive landforms.

Understand how human activities can interact or interrupt these physical processes to initiate change in the landscapes as well as how human activity relies on the effective functioning of natural systems.

Be able to utilise and reinforce geographical skills of map and photo interpretation.

February 2021

 

2-3

A study of Africa

Pupils will:

Extend their locational knowledge and deepen their spatial awareness of the world’s countries with a focus in this unit on the continent of Africa.

Understand why Africa contains a range of environmental regions/ecosystems and be able to locate these on a contextual map.

Understand how human and physical characteristics interact to create unique features in regions of Africa – with a focus on Sudan and Kenya.

Be able to utilise and extend the use of quantitative data, maps and photographs to deepen their understanding as well as their geographical skills.

March and May 2021

 

3

A study of Russia

Pupils will:

Extend their locational knowledge and deepen their spatial awareness of the world’s countries with a focus in this unit on Russia as part of the continent of Asia.

Understand why Russia contains a range of environmental regions/ecosystems and be able to locate these and their climate information on maps and graphs.

Understand how human and physical characteristics interact to create unique features in Russia (e.g. Siberian plain, Ural Mountains).

Be able to identify and understand why similarities, differences and links exist between Africa (Kenya) and Russia as a comparison of African and Asian regions, utilising previously acquired knowledge and understanding from the Africa study.

Be able to utilise and extend the use of quantitative data, maps and photographs to deepen their understanding as well as their geographical skills.

July 2021

8

1

Environmental Issues

Pupils will:

Understand how human and physical processes interact to influence and change the climate, but also how human activity relies on effective functioning of natural systems and the use of natural resources sustainably.

Understand how decisions on economic development can be made using quantitative and qualitative data about brownfield and greenfield sites.

Understand how ecosystems can be managed or destroyed by human activity, and why it is important as we rely on effective natural system functioning.

Be able to interpret OS maps of the school site to gain understanding of the topographical influences on the use of the site – linked to the building design.

Be competent at using fieldwork in a variety of locations to collect, analyse and draw conclusions to enquiry questions they have created using contextual knowledge and understanding of the school site.  This will utilise multiple sources of information and draw on increasingly complex information and interpretation skills.

October 2020

 

1

A Hazardous World

Pupils will:

Deepen their understanding about geological timescales, the role geology plays on shaping our landscapes and the functioning of plate tectonics to explain how this leads to tectonic hazards.

Deepen their understanding about the functioning of rivers and coastal areas; building on their understanding of the role of geology, and the key physical processes that interact with rocks to change the landscapes. Extension of this understanding to allow for writing at length about the risk of flooding that comes from some river and coastal landscapes.

Be able to utilise, analyse and interpret photographs, diagrams, graphs and maps at a variety of scales to enable this understanding and to embed key geographical skills further.  The map-based work will extend understanding about these issues in key areas of the world including India, China and the UK.

December 2020

 

2

Development and Globalisation

Pupils will:

Deepen their understanding about the critical role the development of countries and areas of the world plays in the functioning of individuals, countries and international relations.

Deepen their understanding of the importance of economic development and globalisation in this process, with a focus on the different sectors of industry being understood and exemplified in a range of locations.

Be able to exemplify the issues inherently linked to development and globalisation by linking to previous learning about places in Africa, to Russia, and to other locations across the globe and in the UK. This will enable embedding further the geographical skills of photograph/map/diagram/graph interpretation; cartographical skills such as choropleth mapping and the analysis of data to support explanations about the role of development in individual countries.

January and March 2021

 

2-3

Global Population Changes

Pupils will:

Deepen their understanding of the role that demography and population changes over time have in the functioning of countries, with particular reference and relevance to development levels.

Deepen their understanding of the challenges presented by demographic issues such as ageing populations and youthful populations with place-based examples being drawn from regions of Africa, China, India and Russia.

Be able to understand and interpret data related to population in a variety of forms; graphs, maps and photographs and critically evaluate the steps countries should take to manage their populations.

May 2021

 

 

 

3

A study of the Middle East

Pupils will:

Complete a project based around countries located in the Middle East that covers understanding the unique location of the region globally; the natural resources it benefit from; the development levels different regions within the Middle East experience; the natural ecosystems and habitats that exist and thrive there, including hot deserts, and a comparison of this region and its features both human and physical with other regions studied during KS3.

Deepen and reflect on their knowledge and understanding of the Middle East and other key place specific regions studied in KS3 to be able to write at length about similarities, differences and challenges faced by all regions. 

Be able to further embed geographical skills including map skills and data interpretation and analysis so that they can evidence ‘thinking like geographers’.

July 2021

Where KS3 classes are taught between two teaching staff the order of the units will differ in order to allow for two units to be taught concurrently, but this will be planned to still allow for the sequencing of the curriculum to maximise opportunities for recall and synopticity across the KS3 provision, in order for the curriculum to be ambitious and create a fluency in the learning pupils experience.

KS4 Intent:

As pupils complete the Year 7 and 8 Schemes of Work in Geography they will have had full and in-depth coverage of the National Curriculum requirements for Key Stage 3.  This means that pupils entering Year 9 will have enhancements and gain a mastery learning of Geography through the ‘Global Citizenship’ programme, but those that continue to study Geography for Key Stage 4 will build on and develop their knowledge, skills and understanding in a range of areas of Geography as well as being able to gain in-depth knowledge, understanding and skills in a range of new areas as well, all enabling pupils to become highly competent Geographers as a result of the teachers having a high ambition for pupils and themselves, as well as pupils having access to the full Key Stage 4 provision and more.

Year 9 starts with a focus on knowledge and understanding about the UK’s changing landscapes.  This unit of work builds on knowledge and understanding pupils gained in Key Stage 3 in areas such as the role of ice on the land, the 3 main rock types and a range of physical processes such as weathering and erosion. To extend knowledge and understanding here, pupils are able to fully understand the roles that geology with named examples can play in landscape formation, as well as the role that human activity has and will play alongside physical processes. This unit is studied first as it provides the contextual and conceptual basis for understanding the changing coastal and river landscape units that follow on – understanding the role of geology is critical for understanding these two following units of work.  Coastal landscapes are studied next, using geology as a starting point, but also the detailed focus on the role of physical processes – these are extended from just weathering and erosion in Key Stage 3 to cover 5 process areas and their sub-examples.  The combination of physical processes and geology allow pupils to learn about the range of erosional and depositional landforms before investigating the risks that these can pose to people as well as the environment.  Once the risks are understood, pupils follow on to study the ways in which people can manage and mitigate these risks, and how this management impacts on the environment via a located case study as well.  The same structure and approach is followed for studying the unit of river landscapes, with opportunities for recall and mastery of understanding taken where similarities in processes exist. This unit follows on from coastal landscapes as it brings us into Springtime, where the weather is generally more suited to completing the required fieldwork in a physical environment.  For this we take pupils to investigate river theory in a real world context – in North Wales.  This allows for pupils to experience learning in an entirely new environment, and enhances their cultural capital experiences as they visit locations they otherwise wouldn’t to experience the world more fully.  The analysis of the fieldwork follows next so that pupils gain a full understanding of theory compared to reality, before moving onto the next unit of work; weather hazards and climate change.  This unit follows on with the physical geography theme, but builds on knowledge and understanding of how weather and climate affects the UK to looking at a wider context – branching out from what has been a UK focus up until this point.  Once again, the theoretical systems and processes are taught first, before case study material is investigated.  The case studies for drought and tropical cyclones also cover material from both developing and developed country locations – providing a link back to Key Stage development studies.

Moving on into Year 10, pupils study the final physical geography unit – ecosystems, biodiversity and management.  This is taught following on from the weather unit as the location and distribution of ecosystems, as well as their functioning, rely on weather and climate systems – therefore in order to fully understand ecosystems, weather and climate have to be understood first.  Again, the theoretical nature of ecosystems is addressed first before two located case studies of deciduous woodland and tropical rainforests are focused on.  To enhance learning and provide cultural capital here we take pupils to investigate the deciduous woodland owned by the school so that a greater depth of understanding is gained.  The next stage in the Key Stage 4 curriculum is for pupils to focus in on human geography.  This starts with our local context by studying ‘Changing Cities’ how urbanisation and development in cities has affected Liverpool over the past 200 years.  We choose to study Liverpool as our major UK city because it is contextual relevant and really important for pupils living to understand its history and role in the world today so that they can contribute effectively to its future following on from their studies.  As way of a comparison, we then study in-depth the city of Sao Paulo in Brazil.  There is a wide range of similarities and differences between the two cities, and as well as enhancing cultural capital by learning about places across the globe, this also provides pupils with opportunities to assess methods used to manage and develop each city so that ideas and successes can be identified for future implementation.  In order to build in further cultural capital and geographical understanding, the second area of fieldwork completed in Key Stage 4 is in Liverpool’s CBD where a comparative investigation into the impact Liverpool One has had on frame areas such as St. John’s Shopping Centre is completed.  The use of two case studies from countries at different levels of development also lead on to the next unit which focuses on understanding more in-depth (building on Key Stage 3) global development.  A range of key factors influencing development are studied both theoretically and through the case study of Tanzania, with regular synoptic links pulled out to prior learning; such as weather hazards impacting countries of different development levels differently. 

Into Year 11, The final human geography unit then pulls on a range of pupil understanding about development and rainfall/climate change in order to understand the importance of managing our resources well – specifically focusing on water management. Without understanding this, our pupils risk being ill-informed about how to provide for their own futures, but also those of people in many other world locations where access to clean water is a problem.  As Key Stage 4 begins to reach its end the focus shifts into bringing the prior learning together synoptically to allow pupils to become increasingly confident at ‘thinking like geographers’ – an ambitious aim and entitlement we hold for all of our learners.  The studies focus on a range of UK challenges that synoptically link across all aspects of Key Stage 4 and allow a range and depth of skills application to take place so that pupils can demonstrate their acquired knowledge and understanding successfully.  One final aspect which aids in this process is the opportunity for pupils to revise their physical geography learning in real world locations across North Wales on a fieldtrip, also providing a further cultural capital enhancement. 

All of these details explained here allow for us to be certain that pupils completing Key Stage 4 Geography at St. Julie’s will leave having had the opportunities they are entitled to; for curriculum breadth and depth of understanding to have been acquired and utilised in ways which prepare them for life-long learning outside the classroom.

Implementation:

Year

Term

Topic

Knowledge, skills and understanding

Window for Assessment

9

1

Changing UK Landscapes

Pupils will:

Gain an in-depth knowledge and understanding of the characteristics and location of the UK’s main rock types; the role of geology in shaping landscapes and the role of human activity in influencing these distinctive UK landscapes.

Be able to interpret and use maps of different types and scale to; recognise physical and human features (UK outline and OS maps); identify where different rock types are located from geological maps.

October 2020

 

1

Coastal Landscapes

Pupils will:

Deepen understanding of the range of physical processes that operate in coastal areas; the role of geological structure; physical processes and human activities in influencing coastal landscapes and erosional/depositional landforms.

Gain in depth knowledge and understanding about a located UK example of a coastal area which has been affected by physical processes, human activity and management to address issues of flooding and recession.

Be able to use and embed geographical skills of; interpreting UK geological maps, UK weather and climate data, OS maps and GIS of coastal landforms and human intervention.

November and December 2020

 

2

River Landscapes

Deepen understanding of the range of physical processes that operate in rivers; the role of geological structure; physical processes and human activities in influencing river landscapes and erosional/depositional landforms.

Gain in depth knowledge and understanding about a located UK example of a river which has been affected by physical processes, human activity and management to address issues of flooding.

Be able to use and embed geographical skills of; interpreting UK geological maps, UK weather and climate data, OS maps and GIS of river landforms and human intervention.

January and February 2021

 

2

Physical Geography Fieldwork Enquiry – River Landscapes

Pupils will:

Be confident analysers and enquirers as a result of applying the geographical theory about river processes to a real-life example.

Be able to formulate enquiry questions that can be investigated in the River Alyn to see if it matches the Bradshaw Model.

Be able to select and accurately use a range of fieldwork techniques to measure river discharge, bedload size and shape and landscape features (quantitative and qualitative data).  Additionally, be able to identify how human interactions could influence the river, as well as the role of secondary data sources including flood risk maps.

Gain knowledge and understanding about the functioning of rivers in real life situations via analysis and conclusions drawn from data collected.

April 2021

 

3

Weather Hazards and Climate Change

Pupils will:

Deepen their understanding of key weather and climate functioning and systems including; global atmospheric circulation; natural and human causes of climate change; the distinctive features of the UK climate.

Gain in depth knowledge and understanding of how and why tropical cyclones and droughts occur including: the atmospheric circulation that creates the weather events; reasons for them being hazardous (including characteristics); a range of social, economic and environmental impacts of them; and an assessment of the success of different responses by – individuals, governments and organisations.

Study in detail located examples of the weather hazards from both developing and developed countries so that assessment and evaluation of the differences in impact and responses can take place to deepen understanding.

Utilise geographical skills integrated into teaching to include: graphs, GIS, weather data, socio-economic data analysis.

May, June and July 2021

10

1

Ecosystems, Biodiversity and Management

Pupils will:

Deepen their knowledge and understanding of the location and characteristics of large-scale ecosystems across the globe, how the biosphere acts across these as a vital system and how the UK has its own distinctive ecosystems.

Study in depth the features (abiotic and biotic), biodiversity, goods and services provided by forested areas in two distinctive ecosystems across the globe.  Additionally, for these to consider the management of located examples to assess the effectiveness of human interventions in sustainability.

Be able to locate and recall to apply key information about Tropical Rainforests in Costa Rica and Deciduous Woodland in the Wyre Forest in the UK.

Utilise geographical skills integrated into teaching to include: graphs, GIS, climate data, maps of different biomes.

October, November and December 2020

 

2

Changing Cities

Pupils will:

Gain knowledge and understanding about the concept of urbanisation on global, national and local scales, with a focus on the urbanisation patterns of the UK.

Gain in depth knowledge and understanding of Liverpool (as a major city in the UK) and Sao Paulo as a contrast focusing on the following areas: their context influencing their functions and structures, the impacts of migration, how globalisation and economic change create challenges that require long-term solutions.  Additionally, pupils will assess the impact of the key characteristics on the cities, as well as the effectiveness of management efforts.

Utilise geographical skills integrated into teaching to include: graphs, cartographic sources, satellite image interpretation, analysis of census data, qualitative and quantitative data about quality of life.

January, February and March 2021

 

3

Human Geography Fieldwork Enquiry – Urban Environments and Challenges

Pupils will:

Be confident analysers and enquirers as a result of applying the geographical theory about changing urban environments to a real-life example.

Be able to formulate enquiry questions that can be investigated in Liverpool’s CBD to identify and analyse the impact Liverpool One has had on the CBD to see if it matches the theory of regeneration.

Be able to select and accurately use a range of fieldwork techniques to investigate the quality of the urban environments (core and frame), the land use of different CBD locations and the distance travelled by visitors and their opinions about the regeneration (quantitative and qualitative data).  Additionally, be able to identify how human interactions with the physical landscapes and residents with visitors have an impact on the functioning of Liverpool’s CBD.  This will involve the use of secondary data sources including census data from the Office of National Statistics.

Gain knowledge and understanding about the functioning Liverpool’s CBD in real life situations via analysis and conclusions drawn from data collected.

May 2021

 

3

Global Development

Pupils will:

Deepen their knowledge and understanding of how development is defined and measured, how it varies globally and how it has a range of consequences and strategies in place to address uneven development.

Study in-depth how Tanzania’s development levels have changed over time, the factors that influence its development and how this is also linked to geopolitics, as well as assessing and evaluating the impacts of rapid development in Tanzania.

Utilise geographical skills integrated into teaching including: data measures (e.g. gini coefficient, HDI), choropleth maps, economic data and graphs, population pyramids.

June and July 2021

11

1

Global Development

September 2020

 

 

 

1

Resource Management – Water Resource Management

Pupils will:

Gain knowledge and understanding of what natural resources are, how we use them to meet human needs and the patterns in distribution and consumption vary globally and nationally.

Gain in depth knowledge and understanding of the supply of fresh water globally, the differences in water consumption and supply across developed and developing countries and how meeting the demands for water and managing sustainable water usage in countries of varying levels of development have created opportunities for progress and change – assessment and evaluation of the issues raised.

Utilise geographical skills integrated into teaching including: UK and world maps of fresh water supply and demand, graphs of population and water stress maps.

November and December 2020

 

2

Challenges for the UK

Pupils will:

Utilise synoptic links from topics studied across the KS4 curriculum to establish a deep understanding of how contemporary geographical issues are impacting upon the UK.  These challenges include: UK resource consumption and environmental sustainability, UK settlement, population and economic challenges, the UK’s landscape and climate change challenges.

Mocks in January 2021

February 2021

 

2

Review and application of GCSE Geography fieldwork enquiries

Pupils will:

Review, recall and embed their knowledge, skills and understanding relating from fieldwork completed during the KS4 curriculum. 

Deepen their understanding of the enquiry process for fieldwork familiar and unfamiliar to them.

March 2021

 

3

Thinking Like a Geographer

Pupils will:

Utilise their in-depth knowledge, understanding and skills gained from the KS4 curriculum to create a mastery of traditional and contemporary geographical concepts. 

Apply these aspects in a variety of mediums to ensure that synopticity is maximised and so that pupils complete Year 11 ‘thinking like geographers’.

April 2021

 

KS5 Intent:

The taught experience for students studying Geography at Key Stage 5 is structured to maximise the expertise and experiences of the different teaching staff we have in place in Geography in St. Julie’s.  With such diverse specialisms amongst us reflecting the wide-ranging topic areas of the curriculum at Key Stage 5, we have units taught by different members of staff alongside each other.  This results in the sequencing of units within specialisms and across teaching staff as well.

Year 12 begins with students studying Coastal Landscapes and Change, Tectonic Processes and Hazards and GlobalisationCoastal Landscapes builds on recalling and applying knowledge and understanding gained during Key Stage 4, with the starting point of the role and importance of geology, processes and coastal landforms before moving onto the study of changing landscapes and how this is impacted by human actions, but also how the changes impact upon human actions.  Reference is made across to the Tectonic unit in relation to uplift of land creating distinct changes in coastal landscapes, and also to the carbon cycling unit in Year 13 where the role of climate change is considered.  Tectonic processes and hazards introduces a high level of knowledge and understanding to students very quickly, as this area is not on the Key Stage 4 national curriculum.  Recall is utilised from Key Stage 3 as a starting point, but very quickly it moves on to be a highly scientific unit with ambitious content being studied relating to the functioning and causation of tectonic hazards.  The unit progresses to apply the scientific understanding to risk management and control – synoptically linking to the need to establish why some hazards become disasters and some don’t.  The Globalisation unit starts by identifying that in today’s world, globalisation and global interdependence are continuing to accelerate at a fast pace.  This is resulting in rapidly changing opportunities for businesses and people.  With this, disparities in wealth occur amongst countries and within them.  It is important that we study this to recognise the impacts within the countries.  Cultural impacts on the identity of communities will increase as flows of ideas, people and goods take place.  It is important that we recognise that these impacts will breed uncertainties and tensions within the communities and on the environment, making it essential that we recognise what the sustainable solutions are.

Later in Year 12 the next set of units follow on, with The Water Cycle and Water Insecurity, Diverse Places and Superpowers all starting in Year 12 and continuing into Year 13.  The Water Cycle unit links back to and builds upon the study of Coastal Landscapes in the theoretical basis that is studied first, before focusing on the issues that the availability and use of water presents for the world in the 21st Century.  This aspect in particular builds on knowledge and understanding gained during Key Stage 4 Geography as well.  Diverse Places is a unit studied to build upon Key Stage 4 understanding of places and population and starts with this overview globally before focusing in on specific local places that are contrasting.  Cultural Capital here is gained as students have to visit and investigate two contrasting areas of Liverpool and conduct first-hand fieldwork.  The unit is completed by understanding why places can have conflict and tension, and how these can be managed to create better places to live in for the future – again reference is made to local places including the riots that Toxteth experienced. The third concurrent unit taught is Superpowers.  Global superpowers are identified and developed by several characteristics.  This pattern has changed significantly over time, continues to change rapidly in our lives and will change further in the future. The current superpowers and emerging superpowers have a significant impact on the global economy, politics and the environment.  The influence that these superpowers hold evolves constantly and is challenged by others frequently.  This results in geopolitical implications that impacts on all our lives and how we live and this unit aims to allow students to have ambitious understanding of this issues and impacts so that they can have influence over the running of the world in the future.

The final units studied are the Carbon Cycle and Energy Insecurity and Health, Human Rights and Intervention.  These are taught to follow on from the Water Cycle and Superpowers units respectively.  They therefore build on the prior knowledge and understanding gained, with the carbon cycle studying involving a similar approach to water with the theoretical basis studied first, and then the impact afterwards.  These are synoptically brought together with a study of how both hydrological and carbon cycling are present issues for management into the future, and therefore how important they both are when compared to each other as well.  The ‘Health’ unit links in with previous studies of development and develops these further.  Traditionally, development is measured on an economic scale, but this is changing and it important to look at broader ways of measuring it, such as in a political, social and environmental sense.  Human rights and human welfare need to be considered when deciding on the quality of life within countries.  The law varies nationally and globally and this can have an impact on decisions made at all levels, which in turn can lead to a wide range of geopolitical interventions, from development aid to military campaigns.  The impact of these geopolitical interventions on human health and wellbeing and human rights is varied, with some groups benefitting more than others.  This can lead to increasing inequalities and injustice, which is important to recognise.

The final semi-taught section is that of the coursework – independent investigation.  This allows students to study in-depth an area of their choice and find out how this aspect functions in real world settings.  The independent nature of this requires significant ambition from students and staff, but also an entitlement for students to gain the fieldwork opportunities they need to complete the coursework, also providing cultural capital as well as students investigate places and theories outside of the classroom environment.  This is started at the end of Year 12 to allow for development of ideas and fieldwork to take place during summer months before the writing up is completed during Year 13.

Implementation:

Year

Term

Topic

Knowledge, skills and understanding – an enquiry-based approach to Geography at KS5

Window for Assessment

12

1-2

Coastal Landscapes and Change

Students will address the following enquiry questions to gain a depth of knowledge and understanding:

  1. Why are coastal landscapes different and what processes cause these differences?
  2. How do characteristic coastal landforms contribute to coastal landscapes?
  3. How do coastal erosion and sea level change alter the physical characteristics of coastlines and increase risks?
  4. How can coastlines be managed to meet the needs of all players?

Geographical skills will be integrated into the teaching and learning experiences and will cover the following aspects: GIS mapping of coastal landscapes and recession rates; satellite image interpretation; field sketches; central tendency; student t-test; cost-benefit analysis; photo interpretation; sand dune surveys with a X² test.

October, November, December 2020, January 2021

 

1-2

Tectonic Processes and Hazards

Students will address the following enquiry questions to gain a depth of knowledge and understanding:

  1. Why are some locations more at risk from tectonic hazards?
  2. Why do some tectonic hazards develop into disasters?
  3. How successful is the management of tectonic hazards and disasters?

Geographical skills will be integrated into the teaching and learning experiences and will cover the following aspects: analysis of hazard distribution maps; block diagrams of plate boundaries; analysis of tsunami time-travel maps; correlation tests and statistical analysis of the magnitude of events, deaths and damage; interrogation of large data sets; GIS of hazard risk zones.

October, November and December 2020

 

1-2

Globalisation

Students will address the following enquiry questions to gain a depth of knowledge and understanding:

  1. What are the causes of globalisation and why has it accelerated in recent decades?
  2. What are the impacts of globalisation for countries, different groups of people and cultures and physical environment?
  3. What are the consequences of globalisation for global development and physical environment and how should different players respond to its challenges?

Geographical skills will be integrated into the teaching and learning experiences and will cover the following aspects: proportional flow lines; ranking and scaling of data; analysis of human and physical features on maps; population, deprivation and land-use datasets linked to de-industrialisation; critical use of global TNC and brand value datasets, and World Bank and UN datasets; Lorenz curves and Gini Coefficient.

October, December 2020, February, March 2021

 

 

 

2-3

Diverse Places

Students will address the following enquiry questions to gain a depth of knowledge and understanding:

  1. How do population structures vary? With an in-depth study of our local place (Woolton, Liverpool) and a contrasting place (Kensington, Liverpool).
  2. How do different people view diverse living spaces?
  3. Why are there demographic and cultural tensions in diverse places?
  4. How successfully are cultural and demographic issues managed?

Geographical skills will be integrated into the teaching and learning experiences and will cover the following aspects: investigation of social media; GIS for crime data; interviews with local residents; interpretation of qualitative information about our local places; Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient; indices of ethnic and cultural diversity; analysis of photographic evidence; interpretation of oral accounts of lived experiences and news reports related to change over time.

April, May, June, July 2021

 

2-3

The Water Cycle and Water Insecurity

Students will address the following enquiry questions to gain a depth of knowledge and understanding:

  1. What are the processes operating within the hydrological cycle from global to local scale?
  2. What factors influence the hydrological system over short and long-term timescales?
  3. How does water insecurity occur and why is it becoming such a global issue for the 21st century?

Geographical skills will be integrated into the teaching and learning experiences and will cover the following aspects: proportional flow diagrams; comparative analysis of river regime annual discharges; analysis of storm hydrographs; analysis of water budget graphs; large dataset study of floods and droughts worldwide; interpretation of synoptic charts; analysis of world water stress and scarcity; seasonal variations in river regimes internationally.

March, May, June 2021

 

2-3

Superpowers

Students will address the following enquiry questions to gain a depth of knowledge and understanding:

  1. What are superpowers and how have they changed over time?
  2. What are the impacts of superpowers on the global economy, political systems and the physical environment?
  3. What spheres of influence are contested by superpowers and what are the implications of this?

Geographical skills will be integrated into the teaching and learning experiences and will cover the following aspects: constructing power indexes using complex data sets; mapping past, present and future sphere of influence and alliances using world maps; graphs of world trade growth using linear and logarithmic scales; proportional symbols to map emissions and resource consumption; changing location of the world’s economic centre of gravity; analysis of GDP.

May, July, September 2021

13

1

Diverse Places

Continued from Year 12…students will address the following enquiry questions to gain a depth of knowledge and understanding:

  1. How do population structures vary? With an in-depth study of our local place (Woolton, Liverpool) and a contrasting place (Kensington, Liverpool).
  2. How do different people view diverse living spaces?
  3. Why are there demographic and cultural tensions in diverse places?
  4. How successfully are cultural and demographic issues managed?

Geographical skills will be integrated into the teaching and learning experiences and will cover the following aspects: investigation of social media; GIS for crime data; interviews with local residents; interpretation of qualitative information about our local places; Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient; indices of ethnic and cultural diversity; analysis of photographic evidence; interpretation of oral accounts of lived experiences and news reports related to change over time.

September 2020

 

1

The Carbon Cycle and Energy Security

Students will address the following enquiry questions to gain a depth of knowledge and understanding:

  1. How does the carbon cycle operate to maintain planetary health?
  2. What are the consequences for people and the environment of our increasing demand for energy?
  3. How are the carbon and water cycles linked to the global climate system?

Geographical skills will be integrated into the teaching and learning experiences and will cover the following aspects: proportional flow diagrams showing carbon fluxes; maps of global temperature and precipitation distribution; graphical analysis of the energy mix; maps of global energy trade and flows; GIS of land-use change; analysis of climate model maps for at risk areas from floods or water shortages; plotting graphs of carbon dioxide levels over time.

September, October, November, December 2020

 

1-2

Health, Human Rights and Intervention

Students will address the following enquiry questions to gain a depth of knowledge and understanding:

  1. What is human development and why do levels vary from place to place?
  2. Why do human rights vary from place to place?
  3. How are human rights used as arguments for political and military intervention?
  4. What are the outcomes of geopolitical interventions in terms of human development and human rights?

Geographical skills will be integrated into the teaching and learning experiences and will cover the following aspects: comparison of different measurement of development using ranked data; scatter graphs and correlation techniques; proportional circles; qualitative and quantitative indicators of corruption; flow-line maps; interpretation of sources and photographs; Gini Coefficient.

October, December 2020, January, February, March 2021.

 

1-3

Non-Examined Assessment (NEA) Coursework

Students will be prepared for completing a Non-Examined Assessment – Independent Investigation.  Students will have time in lessons and be directed to work independently on the work outside of lessons as well in order to complete the full piece of coursework.

The independent investigation may relate to human or physical geography or it may integrate them.  The independent investigation will:

  • be based on a question or issue defined and developed by the student individually to address aims, questions and/or hypotheses relating to any of the compulsory or optional content
  • incorporate field data and/or evidence from field investigations, collected individually or in groups
  • draw on the student's own research, including their own field data and, if relevant, secondary data sourced by the student
  • require the student independently to contextualise, analyse and summarise findings and data
  • involve the individual drawing of conclusions and their communication by means of extended writing and the presentation of relevant data.

Guidance and feedback will only be given where regulations set by Ofqual will allow.

 

2-3

Thinking Like a Geographer

Students will spend time in and out of class reflecting on and embedding the learning from the rest of KS5, ensuring that they are able to recall and apply knowledge and understanding synoptically so that they are able to truly ‘think like a geographer’.