English

Overall Curriculum Intent

At the heart of St Julie’s English at KS3 level, is for our pupils to develop a love for reading and writing, alongside strong literacy skills that they can carry over into not only other subjects, but other aspects of their life. It is of utmost importance that our students can speak and write with a high degree of fluency. Our KS3 curriculum balances the importance of Language and Literature; students are given an equal platform onto which they can become fluent speakers, competent and avid readers, and confident writers. We take a creative approach to all aspects of the curriculum and ensure that our pupils compliment their previous knowledge and understanding at KS2, instilling, revisiting, and recalling all aspects of the KS3 curriculum. At KS3 level, at the core of our teaching is stretch and challenge, addressing misconceptions, no barriers to reading, and an unequivocal love of English.

Year 7

In Year 7, we ensure consolidation of skills from KS2 but with new and engaging material. In the autumn term, all year 7 students, through the lens of the Gothic Novel Jane Eyre, build of their prior knowledge of inference, summary, deduction, and evaluation. The students begin with an introduction to the Gothic Genre. Students learn to appreciate our rich and varied literary heritage through Bronte’s Jane Eyre. Through their own non-fiction research, the students gain an understanding of the cultural context of the novel. Students use Bronte’s novel to be able to read critically and comment on the writer’s crafting of structure, language, figurative language, setting, plot and characterisation. Pupils then use this in-depth knowledge of the Gothic Genre, to plan, draft, edit and proofread a piece of descriptive writing. Building on KS2 knowledge of editing and evaluation, students can amend and upskill vocabulary.

Next, is the innovative unit ‘Women that Changed the World.’ Through this scheme, we take the pupils on a journey through the ages, to educate the pupils using poetry, prose, and drama, on the amazing impact women have had on the world we live in today. Throughout this unit, the students revisit some of the powerful female characters we have encountered in Jane Eyre, this time comparing these characters to some of the other key figures we study. Throughout this unit, the students further develop their reading of non-fiction texts, by comparing and evaluating the presentation of key figures. Furthermore, pupils are asked to use Standard English by giving a short speech, expressing their ideas of a key female role model in their lives, in a succinct but engaging manner. Additionally, students are asked to express their creativity by creating a rap, poem, or short story, using methods used from the writer’s we have studied.

Finally, students move onto the study of Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night. Through this engaging narrative, each class studies Shakespeare’s exploration of romantic love, gender roles and comedy. They build on the skill of deduction, inference, and evaluation that they have developed during the study of Jane Eyre and use these skills to access Shakespeare’s text. During the exploration of this challenging text, students are informed of the social and historical context that underpins the plot. This knowledge is used to comment on the reaction of contemporary and modern audiences. Students draw on the skills developed in the previous study of Jane Eyre; the students are able to develop a deeper understanding of Shakespeare’s choice of language, plot, and development of character. Students also rehearse and perform sections of the play to be able to confidently articulate the impact of language, stillness, action and how Shakespeare’s drama has been crafted purposefully for impact. The full text is studied, with the close analysis of several key scenes, particularly those depicting romance and comedy. Students use their prior knowledge of Shakespearean social, historical, and contextual knowledge to comment on how the play is comedic. Different versions of the play are critically analysed, with the students evaluating how different staging and production allows for different interpretations of the play.

Throughout year 7, we also have a full year focus on Speaking and Listening, an essential part of the pupils learning across all areas. To do this, we deliver Let’s Think in English (LTE) a teaching programme, developed by King’s College London, which helps secondary pupils develop the higher-order skills needed for success in English. These include inference, deduction, and analysis together with confidence and resilience when responding to unfamiliar texts.

Year 8

The year 8 curriculum begins with the appreciation of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, linking seamlessly to the previous study of Twelfth Night taught in the summer term of Year 7. This allows the students to really master the exploration and evaluation of Shakespeare’s work. Mirroring the assessment style from year 7, students are required to explore an extract of Shakespeare’s work, evaluating and critically analysing stagecraft and characterisation. Students are asked to evaluate whether this is the greatest love story of all time, or a tale of conflict and anguish. Again, pupils look at different versions of the play; building on their knowledge from year 7, to now decide on their own production of a famous scene from the play, the balcony scene.

Next, year 8 students face the challenge of ‘Conflict through the Ages.’ The students look at extracts from prose and poetry from across the ages, looking at the presentation of Conflict. The pupils use their appreciation of the range of works to produce their own piece of creative writing on the theme of conflict. They receive a photo stimulus to produce this. Student then use their evaluation skills to explore why they have chosen the language they have and evaluate its impact. The students then end the unit with a six-week study of the modern drama, An Inspector Calls. This important work teaches the students the importance of community and looking after one another. Throughout this unit, students participate in formal debates linking to the contextual background of the novel. Students also compare the presentation of conflict across the range of texts that they have studied earlier in the course.

Finally, we move onto our whole department novel ‘Of Mice and Men.’ Regardless of prior attainment, all year 8 pupils access this seminal work. The novel captures a range of social and historical issues: poverty, racism, the impact of government on society, treatment, and portrayal of female characters within Literature, masculinity to name but a few. Students draw upon their knowledge of the critical analysis of texts, to further delve into the evaluation of Steinbeck’s plot and character. Students use social and historical understanding to write a tabloid and newspaper article describing the conditions of the ranches, building on and developing their transactional writing skills from Year 7’s ‘Women who Changed the World’ unit. They are also tasked with evaluating and critically analysing key themes from within the text.

Throughout year 8, we turn our focus to the importance of strong Literacy skills. The literacy scheme is designed to improve and maintain literacy standards. The pupils work through a series of tasks, modelled by the teacher, on specific aspects of literacy e.g. apostrophes, spelling strategies. Pupils will then take these skills to other lessons/curriculum areas. This aspect of the curriculum is taught as cross-curricular rather than subject specific.

Implementation:

Year

Term

Topic

Knowledge, skills and understanding

Window for Assessment

7

Autumn

Victorian Literature: Jane Eyre

Descriptive Writing

Character Question

October

December

7

Spring

Women Who Changed the World

Non-Fiction comparative question

Transactional Writing

February

March

7

Summer

Shakespeare: Twelfth Night

Extract Question

Speaking and Listening task

May

July

8

Autumn

Shakespeare: Romeo and Juliet

Extract analysis

Character/theme question (essay style)

October

December

8

Spring

Conflict in Society

Crafting of own poem and written analysis

Exploration of staging and writer’s craft in An Inspector Call’s

February

March

8

Summer

Of Mice and Men

 

Transactional Writing

Essay Question (Character or Theme)

May

July

 

KS4 Intent:

At St Julie’s, our curriculum model allows for a creative and fun approach to the teaching of content, alongside the close drilling of skills. Each pupil has 3 lessons of English Literature and 2 lessons of English Language, at KS4.  We begin KS4 by looking at a range of fiction texts and looking closely at the structure of texts. For example, the whole of year 9 begin by using the film ‘Jaws’ and a section of the novel, to understand how both text and film are crafted with audience and reader reaction in mind. Using this acquired knowledge of the structure of texts, the pupils then move onto the planning, drafting, editing and proof reading of their own descriptive and narrative writing. Our creative approach to the appreciation of fiction texts, allows the pupils to read widely for pleasure and to use this to create their own fictional works.

Year 9 students then move onto the reading and understanding of non-fiction texts. Throughout this unit, we are able to use texts that build on the pupil’s already strong appreciation of our rich and varied heritage. Through this study, students not only evaluate a writer’s work, but they are able to adapt their language and style to create their own piece of transactional writing. Pupils take this opportunity to do their required Speaking and Listening element of the course. Students take a topic that they are able to debate. Pupils, due to a real focus in KS3, are already adept in the arts of speaking and listening. Through this unit they get even more competent and fluent in public speaking.

Throughout KS4, we have chosen the texts that we feel best allow the pupils to appreciate the depth and power of English Literary Heritage. In Year 9, their English Literature course begins with the study of the renowned text Macbeth. The students are adept at exploring Shakespeare, due to their entitlement of study of two Shakespeare texts at KS3. Throughout this unit, students begin by understanding the contextual relevance of the drama; the pupils, through classroom teaching and their own sourcing of research and information, are able to use this knowledge to make an informed, personal response to the text. Over time, the students are able to use their KS3 knowledge of grammar, vocabulary, and the crafting of texts, to evaluate plot, character and theme. The pupils then move onto the study of Blood Brothers. Russell’s famed musical, based in Liverpool, is the perfect platform for our students to move their understanding and appreciation of the stage, to a modern drama. Again, the pupils begin with a clear understanding of the social and political understanding of the play. They learn about the impact of Thatcher’s government on the working classes, the class and education system and the impact of nature and nurture on a child’s upbringing. Once again, the students use the deepened knowledge of context to explore, analyse and evaluate Russell’s writer’s craft. The study of a Shakespearean drama and Russell’s modern stage play enriches every pupil understanding of how words are ultimately defined by the context in which they were written. Through discussion, pupils can confidently, audibly, and effectively convey their viewpoints and attitudes toward the texts. Finally, in year 9, pupils further consolidate their analytical skills through the study of the Love and Relationships Anthology. Again, building on their KS3 understanding of the crafting of poems, each poem is looked at in turn, defining how language, form, and structure impacts on meaning.

During the autumn term of Year 10, the students study a Pre-20th Century Novel. Victorian Britain is the historical background here, an era which pupils have a clear understanding of due to their study of the Gothic genre at KS3. The remainder of year 10 is spent revisiting prior units, with a key focus on pupils knowing and remembering more. This is done by highly independent challenge tasks, the use of low stakes quizzes, 5 a day starter challenges, and rigorous ‘walking, talking mocks.’

Year 11 serves as a year of the mastery of skills. Lessons are engaging and creatively ensure that pupils are full prepared for not only the GCSE examinations, but for life. By the end of KS4, students can confidently communicate the power of language. The KS4 course allows each pupil to access the material; the most able pupils can master these skills and use them fluently and confidently across different subject areas and platforms.

Implementation:

Year

Term

Topic

Knowledge, skills and understanding

Window for Assessment

9

Autumn

English Language Reading (Identifying information in a fiction text; Exploration of structure in a Fiction Text)

English Language Writing: Descriptive Writing

 

Paper 1 English Literature: Macbeth

Pupils begin by becoming adept at successfully identifying information from a text, in a comprehensive style assessment. Pupils then focus on how a writer structures a text and the methods they may use to do so. Students then use these skills and knowledge to create their own piece of descriptive writing.

Pupils study the Shakespearean text Macbeth and learn to evaluate plot, character and theme. This is evidenced through the close analysis of two extracts from the text, based around a character or theme e.g. ambition.

October/December 2020

December

 

 

 

 

October/ December 2020

9

Spring

English Language Reading: English Language (Identifying and synthesising information; comparing writer’s methods in Non-Fiction texts)

English Language Writing (Transactional Writing)

 

 

 

 

Paper 2 English Literature: Blood Brothers

Pupils will be able to identify and interpret information from texts. They will then use this information to synthesise and summarise information from two texts. Building upon these skills, pupils will then compare writers’ ideas and perspectives, as well as how they are conveyed, in two texts.

Pupils will then use this knowledge, to write in a number of different styles for different audiences: Article, Speech, Report and Review are among the first styles that the pupils will become confident with.

Pupils study the Liverpudlian based play Blood Brother and learn to evaluate plot, character and theme, using an in depth knowledge of the impact of social and historical context. This is evidenced through the two different essays based around a character from the play e.g. Mrs Lyons, Mrs Johnstone, Mickey, Eddie.

February/ March 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

February/March 2021

9

Summer

English Language (Analysis of language features; Evaluate texts critically)

English Language (Transaction Writing and Delivery of Speaking and Listening)

 

 

English Literature: Love and Relationships Poetry

Pupils will become fluent in explaining, commenting on and analysing how writers use language and structure to achieve effects and influence readers. Pupils will then return to Transactional Writing, this time using their skills to deliver a Persuasive speaking and listening task specifically to their peers.

Pupils will study each poem in the anthology in turn, exploring how writers explore the theme of love and relationships within each work. Students will grow in confidence in their ability to evaluate the impact of language, form and structure on the reader. Pupils will showcase their skills by evaluating two different poems from the anthology.

May/ July 2021

 

 

 

 

 

May/July 2021

10

Autumn

English Language (Identifying information; analysis of language feature in Non-Fiction Writing Q3)

English Language (Narrative Writing)

 

 

English Literature: 19th Century Novel (Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)

Pupils will return to focusing on how and why writer’s craft their writing for the purpose of their reader. Pupils will explain and analysis writer’s methods. Pupils will then again move to their own creative writing, this time planning, drafting, editing and proofreading their own narrative.

Pupils study Victorian gothic novel Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde and further integrate their ability to evaluate plot, character and theme, using an in depth knowledge of the impact of social and historical context. This is evidenced through the exploration of two different close readings of extracts from the novella.

October/ December 2021

 

 

 

 

 

October/December 2021

10

Spring

English Language (Non-fiction analysis; Transactional Writing )

 

 

 

English Literature: Poetry Anthology and Unseen Poetry

Pupils master their skills of analysis and evaluation of non-fiction texts, alongside their own creation of a non-fiction texts. Pupils become more adept at their ability to craft their writing based on audience and style.

Pupils master their ability evaluate the impact of language, form and structure on the reader. Pupils will showcase their skills by evaluating two different poems from the anthology. Pupils will then move onto the independent use of these skills, with the exploration of ‘Unseen Poetry.’

February/ March 2021

 

 

 

February/ March 2021

10

Summer

Paper 1 English Language (Analysis of Fiction texts; Creative Writing)

English Literature: Macbeth

Pupils master their skills of analysis and evaluation of fiction texts, alongside their own creation of a fiction texts. Pupils become more proficient at crafting their writing, thinking about the impact on their reader.

Pupils return to the study of Macbeth, focusing on a mastery of knowledge of plot, character and theme. Pupils are now confident in their ability to evaluate Shakespeare’s use of stagecraft.

May/July 2021

 

 

 

May/July 2021

11

Autumn

English Language (Exploration and creation of Non-Fiction)

 

 

 

 

Paper 2 English Literature (Blood Brothers; Love and Relationships Poetry; Unseen Poetry)

Pupils continue to master their skills of analysis and evaluation of non-fiction texts, alongside their own creation of a non-fiction texts. Pupils become more adept at their ability to craft their writing based on audience and style. Pupils can more confidently proofread and self-edit their responses by this point in their studies.

Pupils continue to master their ability to comment on, analyse and evaluate the impact of language, form and structure on the reader. Pupils will showcase their skills by evaluating two different poems from the anthology. Pupils will then move onto their independent use of these skills, with the exploration of ‘Unseen Poetry. Pupils become more autonomous in their learning and responses by this point in their studies.

October/ December 2021

 

 

 

 

 

October/ December 2021

11

Spring

English Language (Exploration and Creation of Fiction)

 

 

English Literature (Macbeth; Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)

Pupils master their skills of analysis and evaluation of fiction texts, alongside their own creation of a fiction texts. Pupils become more adept at their ability to craft their writing, thinking about the impact on their reader.

Pupils return to the study of Macbeth, focusing on a mastery of knowledge of plot, character and theme. Pupils are now confident in their ability to evaluate Shakespeare’s use of stagecraft. Furthermore, pupils will become more confident in the close analysis and exploration of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde.

February

March

February

March

11

Summer

English Language: Mastery and Consolidation Unit

 

English Literature: Mastery and Consolidation Unit

Pupils will become autonomous in their ability to analyse, comment on and evaluate both Fiction and Non-Fiction Texts.

Pupils gain further confidence in their ability to evaluate the impact of writer’s methods in the range of texts studied.

May 2021

 

 

May 2021

KS5 Intent:

In year 12 and 13, St Julie’s offer two KS5 courses: English Literature and English Language and Literature. Both units allow pupils to develop academic autonomy. Students become adept at making critical, perceptive, and evaluative comments in a literary or stylistic manner. Our teaching focuses on the pupils being able to independently and creatively respond to texts.

Our A-level English Language and Literature scheme draws on the academic field of Stylistics in order to create an integrated English Language and Literature course which brings together literary and non-literary discourses. This study integrates literary and linguistic fields via shared concepts about the way language choices create representations, both in literary and non-literary texts: words create worlds, both in literature and elsewhere. Using literary and linguistic concepts and methods, students analyse literary and non-literary texts in a range of modes and genres, in the process gaining insights into the nature of different discourses and ideas about creativity. Students develop skills as producers and interpreters of language by creating texts themselves and critically reflecting on their own processes of production. At St Julie’s, the course begins with an introduction to Stylistics, by way of the Paris Anthology. This is the study of an anthology of non-literary texts. Pupils are taught to look closely at their ‘literariness’ and evaluate the concepts and methods used by writer’s. Simultaneously, with their other class teacher, students read Atwood’s acclaimed novel A Handmaid’s Tale. Through the study of the novel, the pupils engage with how Atwood has created this unnerving, dystopic world. Students then move onto Duffy’s Anthology ‘Mean Time.’ Pupils build on their newfound knowledge of stylistics to interpret the challenging and powerful poetry of Duffy. Students also begin their study of the famed novella The Great Gatsby. Pupils consolidate two skills: the ability to interpret a text and creatively produce additional material in line with the writer’s style. This is done at this part of the course, as pupils now have a good base knowledge of a range of texts and how to approach them stylistically. Year 12 students are introduced to the NEA (Non-Examined Assessment) section of the course by the end of year 12. Students are now more confident in their stylistic analysis skills. They choose their own texts in this unit to produce a 3000-word investigative account. Examples of essays in the past are ‘An investigation into how language is used to manipulate in 1984 and Donald Trump’s inauguration speech.’

In A Level English Literature, the students gain a solid understanding of how texts can be connected and how they can be interpreted in multiple ways so that students can arrive at their own interpretations and become confident autonomous readers. Students are then not only equipped with the knowledge and skills needed for the course but also experience a rich approach to English literature that provides an excellent basis for studying the subject at university. The specification encourages the exploration of texts in a number of different ways: the study of texts within specific genres; the study of texts through engagement with a range of theoretical ideas; writing about texts in a number of different ways. Students begin with the study of the tragic genre through Shakespeare’s acclaimed Othello. All KS5 students already have a sound understanding of how to critically analyse Shakespearean Literature. They build on this contextual and theoretical understanding to give innovative and perceptive responses to the text. Simultaneously, students begin their study of The Kite Runner through the lens of social protest writing. Students are required to study the book, look critically at the writer’s methods and how they are used to show the oppression and struggle of the people of Afghanistan. This study serves as an excellent enrichment of a modern political issue incorporated with how writer’s use literature to portray to plight of a sector of society. The study of the tragic genre continues with the acclaimed gothic novel ‘Tess of the d’Urbervilles.’ Students have a well-established understanding of the Victorian gothic, due to teaching across KS3 and KS4. Students now use this base knowledge to turn a critical eye at to how this novel is both gothic and tragic. At this point in the course, students begin their NEA (Non-Examined Assessment) Pupils must produce a critical investigation of a prose and poetry text of their choice. Pupils study the texts independently looking at different strands of critical argument e.g. Feminism, Marxism. Students are able to produce work independently as they have become more proficient at these skills in earlier modules of the course. Pupils must Next, pupils look closely at the Ibsen’s translated text of A Doll’s House. Pupils build on their critical and evaluative skills, again look at social protest writing. The students question the plight of numerous characters and question the impact of the restrictive and oppressive Victorian doctrines on society, in this domestic sphere. Lastly, students look at Death of a Salesman and William Blake’s poetry. Pupil have by this point, well established their ability to critically evaluate writer’s methods.

The distribution of each of the A Level courses allows for each unit to be revisited across the course and skills to be mastered. Pupils finish their KS5 English course as independent, critical, creative evaluative readers and writers, skills that can be transferred to numerous lines of employment.

Implementation: A Level English Language and Literature

Year

Term

Topic

Knowledge, skills and understanding

Window for Assessment

12

Autumn

Teacher 1: Paris Anthology

 

 

 

 

Teacher 2: A Handmaid’s Tale

Pupils will be able to:

Explore the impact of writer’s methods in extracts from the Paris Anthology

Confidently use language levels in their exploration and analysis

Explore the impact of writer’s methods in A Handmaid’s Tale

Confidently use language levels in their exploration and analysis

Explore the impact of context of the way in which reader’s engage with the text

Confidently engage with A Handmaid’s Tale as a Dystopia

October/December 2021

 

 

 

 

October/ December 2021

12

Spring

Teacher 1: Paris Anthology/Great Gatsby

 

 

 

 

Teacher 2: Duffy’s Mean Time

Pupils will be able to:

Explore the impact of writer’s methods in extracts from the Paris Anthology, using language levels fluently to explore and analyse

Explore the impact of writer’s methods in Great Gatsby and use this knowledge to creatively craft their own writing.

Explore the impact of writer’s methods in Duffy’s Mean Time

Confidently use language levels in their exploration and analysis

February/ March 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

February/ March 2021

 

12

Summer

Teacher 1: NEA/Great Gatsby

 

 

 

 

Teacher 2: NEA/ Streetcar Named Desire

Pupils will be able to:

Explore the impact of writer’s methods in Great Gatsby and use this knowledge to creatively craft their own writing.

Explore the impacts of writer’s methods in Great Gatsby

Confidently use language levels in their exploration and analysis

Explore the impact of writer’s methods in Streetcar Named Desire.

Confidently use language levels in their exploration and analysis

In both units, pupils will study the contextual background of each work, and be able to fluently integrate this understanding into their work.

May/June 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

May /June 2021

 

13

Autumn

Teacher 1: Streetcar Named Desire/NEA

 

 

 

Teacher 2: Gatsby/Paris Anthology

Pupils will be able to:

Explore the impact of writer’s methods in Streetcar Named Desire.

Confidently use language levels in their exploration and analysis

With confidence and independence, explore the impact of writer’s methods in Great Gatsby and use this knowledge to creatively craft their own writing.

With confidence and independence, explore the impact of writer’s methods in extracts from the Paris Anthology

Confidently use language levels in their exploration and analysis

October/ December 2021

 

 

 

October/December 2021

13

Spring

Teacher 1: Duffy Anthology/Handmaid’s Revision

Teacher 2: Paris Anthology/Gatsby

Pupils will be able to:

Explore the impact of writer’s methods in Duffy’s Mean Time

Confidently use language levels in their exploration and analysis

With confidence and independence, explore the impact of writer’s methods in A Handmaid’s Tale

Confidently use language levels in their exploration and analysis

Explore the impact of context of the way in which reader’s engage with the text

Confidently engage with A Handmaid’s Tale as a Dystopia. At this point, pupils will be fluently be able to discuss the impact of narrative methods on the creation of Atwood’s storyworld.

Explore the impact of writer’s methods in extracts from the Paris Anthology, with confidence

Proficiently use language levels in their exploration and analysis

Explore the impact of writer’s methods in Great Gatsby and use this knowledge to creatively craft their own writing.

Explore the impact of writer’s methods in Great Gatsby

February

March

February

March

13

Summer

Teacher 1: Revision of all Units

Teacher 2: Revision of all Units

Pupils will be able to more autonomously tackle, evaluate and create texts.

May 2021

 

 Implementation: A Level English Literature

Year

Term

Topic

Knowledge, skills and understanding

Window for Assessment

12

Autumn

Teacher 1: Othello

 

 

 

 

 

Teacher 2: The Kite Runner

Pupils will:

Begin to engage with debate on the text and connect the text to the genre of Tragedy.

Begin to form an understanding of the elements of a Shakespearean tragedy and use literary concepts and terminology.

Start to engage with debate with The Kite Runner and connect the text to the genre of Political and Social Protest.

Form an understanding of the elements of the genre and use literary concepts and terminology.

Gain a thorough understanding of the political backdrop of the novel and use this understanding to engage with the text.

In both units, pupils will begin to write in an academic fashion, evaluating writer’s methods in an articulate manner.

October/December 2020

 

 

 

 

 

October/December 2020

12

Spring

Teacher 1: Tess of the d’Urbervilles

 

 

 

 

 

 

Teacher 2: A Doll’s House

Pupils will

Begin to engage with debate in relation to Tess of the d’Uberville and connect the text to the genre of Tragedy. Take their understanding of tragedy from the previous unit and apply this knowledge to the novel. More confidently be able to use literary concepts and terminology that are relevant to the line of discussion.

Begin to engage with debate with A Doll’s House and connect the text to the genre of Political and Social Protest.

Build upon their understanding of the elements of the genre and use literary concepts and terminology.

Gain a thorough understanding of the political backdrop of the drama and use this understanding to engage with the text.

In both units, pupils will begin to write in an academic fashion, evaluating writer’s methods in an articulate manner.

February/March 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

February/March 2021

12

Summer

Teacher 1: Death of a Salesman/Introduction to NEA Prose

Teacher 2: William Blake/An Introduction to NEA Poetry

Pupils will:

Begin to engage with debate in relation to Death of a Salesman and connect the text to the genre of Tragedy. Take their understanding of tragedy from the previous unit and apply this knowledge to the drama.

More confidently be able to use literary concepts and terminology that are relevant to the line of discussion. Gain a sound understanding of the American backdrop of the drama and become knowledgeable about the political issues such as Capitalism.

Begin to engage with debate William Blake’s Anthology and connect the text to the genre of Political and Social Protest. Pupils will now have sound understanding of the elements of the genre and use literary concepts and terminology with confidence.

Gain a thorough understanding of the political backdrop of the drama and use this understanding to engage with the text. Pupils can use their knowledge from the previous study of this era to inform ideas.

In both units, pupils will begin to write in an academic fashion, evaluating writer’s methods in an articulate manner.

May/June 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

May /June 2021

 

13

Autumn

Teacher 1: Death of a Salesman/NEA Prose

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Teacher 2: A Doll’s House/NEA Poetry

Pupils will:

Continue to engage in debate in relation to Death of a Salesman and connect the text to the genre of Tragedy.

Take their understanding of tragedy from the previous unit and apply this knowledge to the drama.

More confidently be able to use literary concepts and terminology that are relevant to the line of discussion. Gain a sound understanding of the American backdrop of the drama and become knowledgeable about the political issues such as Capitalism.

Return to the exploration of Ibsen’s A Doll’s House and connect the text to the genre of Political and Social Protest. Pupils will use their prior knowledge of the elements of the genre and use literary concepts and terminology.

Gain a thorough understanding of the political backdrop of the drama and use this understanding to engage with the text.

In all units, pupils will begin to write in an academic fashion, evaluating writer’s methods in an articulate manner.

 

October/ December 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

October/December 2021

13

Spring

Teacher 1: Tess of the d’Urbervilles/Section C

Teacher 2: Blake/Unseen

 

Teacher 1: Othello

Teacher 2: The Kite Runner/Section C

Pupils will be able to more autonomously: evaluate writer’s methods, use literary concepts and methods, use aspects of the specified genre to engage in debate about the texts.

February 2021

 

 

 

March 2021

13

Summer

Teacher 1: Revision of all units

Teacher 2: Revision of all units

Pupils will continue to master their autonomous evaluation of writer’s methods, use of literary concepts and methods and the use of specified ge

May 2021