English

Overall Rationale:

 

Our aim of St Julie’s English at KS3, is for our pupils to become local and global citizens through their exposure to literature from a range of genres, cultures and authors. Our curriculum takes the pupils on a journey looking at elements of the past and present. Through the study of a wealth of literature, pupils will develop a love for reading and writing, alongside strong literacy skills that they can carry over into not only other subjects, but all aspects of their life. Alongside this we instil a range of important life skills: empathy, tolerance, compassion and understanding. Our KS3 curriculum balances the importance of Language and Literature; students are given an equal platform onto which they can become fluent speakers, competent and avid readers, and confident writers. We take a creative approach to all aspects of the curriculum and ensure that our pupils compliment their previous knowledge and understanding at KS2, instilling, revisiting, and recalling all aspects of the KS3 curriculum. At KS3 level, at the core of our teaching is stretch and challenge; from Beowulf to Priestley, Greek Mythology to Malorie Blackman, our aim is to have no barriers to reading and an unequivocal love of English. 

 

In Year 7, we start with ‘History of English.’ Students study this unit in order to gain a deeper understanding about the language we read, write, speak and hear. They will trace the history and development of the English language, learning about the influence of Anglo Saxon; French, Latin and Shakespeare to modern day language usage. This unit covers all aspects of the form and use of spoken and written English in order that students can consider the ways it has developed over time, how it is changing, and what the future of English might be. Through independent research, class discussion and close analysis of key events in the history of English, students will understand that language changes over time and is influenced by events and inventions. They will study challenging texts from the Old English period such as the Anglo Saxon poem Beowulf through close read and listening to how the language sounds. To enhance their understanding and enjoyment of the Middle English period, students will read examples from Chaucer, including the prologue to the Canterbury Tales and extracts from the Merchant’s Tale. Through discussion and examination of their own language use, students will revisit the relevance of Johnson’s Dictionary; explore the etymology of modern spoken language and how this reflects changing attitudes and ideas. They will be introduced to neologisms, blends and clippings when revisiting the morphology and etymology of slang terms; and utilise this knowledge to produce and perform a persuasive speech about the use of slang.  

 

Next, the students gain an introduction to the Gothic Genre. Students will gain a greater understanding of what ‘genre’ means and find enjoyment in studying the ‘Gothic’ which allows them to think creatively and critically. During their study of this genre, students will explore a variety of texts, including ‘classic’ Gothic prose such as DraculaFrankenstein and Edgar Allen Poe’s The Tell-Tale Heart, and more contemporary Gothic writing such as The Woman In Black. Students also look at Gothic poetry through Poe’s The Raven and Christina Rossetti’s After Death. In their previous module, History of the English Language, students explore the Anglo Saxon epic poem Beowulf. Students can use knowledge of form, meter and structure of epic poems to guide their understanding of Robert Browning’s My Last Duchess, as well as commenting on the Gothic features and concepts. Throughout the module, there are in-built opportunities to address common grammar misconceptions and consolidate knowledge of how to sustain a formal tone in their own writing. Students will produce a descriptive writing piece with a Gothic focus for their assessment. They will use this in-depth knowledge of the Gothic Genre to plan, draft, edit and proofread a piece of descriptive writing, building upon prior KS2 skills. Students will have learnt how Gothic writers use literary concepts and Gothic features in their writing, and be able to emulate this in their own, original work. Building on KS2 knowledge of editing and evaluation, students can amend and upskill vocabulary.  

Subsequently, all Year 7 students will read the Gothic Novel Jane Eyre. Bronte’s most successful novel, published in 1847, is a critique on the Victorian assumptions of gender and class. This is a challenging read for our Year 7 students and also builds on their cultural capital. Using skills from KS2, students will build of their prior knowledge of inference, summary, deduction, and evaluation. By doing so, these skills will become commonplace in both the English classroom, Reading for Pleasure, and throughout many aspects of their lives. These skills are then linked to the specific prominence of the Gothic in Victorian literature, particularly during the ‘fin de siècle’. Reading Jane Eyre allows the students to be able to read critically and comment on the writer’s crafting of structure, language, figurative language, setting, plot and characterisation. During their study of this novel, Year 7 will focus on the structural concept of the ‘Bildungsroman’, as well as themes of religion, education, the role of women, social class and poverty. They will also focus on conventions of Romanticism such as ‘The Byronic Hero’. Further to this, through their own non-fiction research, the students gain an understanding of the cultural context of the novel. Group tasks and homework will include research and study of Charlotte Bronte’s life, Victorian schools and the role of the Governess. Students will explore letters by Charles Dickens focusing on his observations about everyday people in early 1800, and his pleas for NHS protection in his article, ‘Drooping Buds’. This allows links to ideas about poverty, childhood and class in Victorian life. Finally, students will evaluate if Jane Eyre is a feminist novel and consider the impact of Charlotte Bronte, a female novelist, writing about a female during Victorian times.  

 

In term 3, we move to Shakespeare’s romantic comedy Twelfth Night to explore the theme of identity. As students’ first exposure to the works of Shakespeare and Early Modern English in Key Stage 3, the aim is to build on prior Key Stage 2 learning with a slapstick play that draws upon a variety of significant social & historical concepts, such as love and romance through the love triangle of Duke Orsino, Olivia and Cesario; gender & androgyny and how these are portrayed through the character of Viola, who masks her identity as a male called Cesario and how Shakespeare presents ideas around truth and deception. Throughout the play, students are presented with many opportunities to read aloud, promoting oracy and social engagement in the classroom. Wider historical themes such as social class and patriarchy learned in the previously studied Victorian novel Jane Eyre are developed in this unit, giving students the opportunity to build on their critical understanding of social and historical context. Students will draw upon their learning and are assessed on representation of identity and how Shakespeare uses language to develop the character Duke Orsino. Students are awarded for their interpretation of the plot, their analysis of writer’s craft and evaluation of historical context such as social norms when the play was written in 1601. There are also opportunities to write at length throughout the unit exploring the androgenous Viola, which allows students to craft their writing to empathise with modern day issues such as LGBTQ+ and gender identity. 

 

Year 8 

 

Year 8 begin their programme of study with William Shakespeare’s famed tragedy, Romeo and Juliet. This unit of work follows the previous curricular study of Shakespeare in Year 7 with the reading of Twelfth Night. The intention of the scheme is to facilitate a strong understanding of the play’s narrative, its structure and the development of key characters and dramatic themes. This approach will strengthen cross-curricular understanding, linking well with the pupils’ study of History, particularly the Tudors.  Further cross-curricular references are included, promoting a deeper understanding of the influence of religion on society in Elizabethan Britain. The lessons aim to develop prior learning by extending the style of response expected in Year 7, taking straightforward comprehension-style answers and introducing a more formal academic approach. This sequential approach to learning is developed as key terminology builds on their existing understanding. New terminology is built into the start of each lesson with definitions and appropriate examples used to model this vocabulary used in context. Students will be encouraged to predict dramatic events and consider the audience expectations of both Jacobean and modern audiences. Alongside this developmental approach, pupils will also be monitored for retention and recall through a series of low-stakes quizzes and short character/event recall challenges. The scheme includes two opportunities for formal assessment that look beyond the pupils’ ability to locate relevant evidence from the text.  Students will first be assessed on their understanding of character development throughout the play. In the second assessment, pupils will be asked to demonstrate their understanding of how Shakespeare presents the theme of conflict.

 

Next, learners engage in the varied and diverse ‘Conflict through the Ages.’  In this unit, students will be exploring the theme of conflict through the lens of classic literature. Initially, the unit will focus on contrasting poems inspired by World War One, from writers such as Owen, Pope and Brooke. As part of this initial introduction, the students will develop their attitudes to war by evaluating the writer’s viewpoints; the varied causes of war and the impact it has on society. This initial focus will help the students to appreciate the impact of a poem’s social, historical and cultural context as well as developing the analytical skills required to become critical thinkers and readers. For example, students will be taught the necessary analytical skills, such as how to identify a poem’s themes/ideas, narrative voice, basic structural elements, tone and dynamic vocabulary choices. As the unit progresses, students will be exposed to poems centred around more modern conflicts, from poets such as Armitage and Duffy; this will broaden the students’ perspectives on the far-reaching implications of conflict, such as familial struggles and emotional trauma. Students will read non-fiction texts surrounding issues such as Black Lives Matter, Climate Change and social deprivation. In terms of skills, students will build upon a variety which were taught in Year 7 such as writing empathetically (Women Who Changed the World); planning, drafting and editing a poetry response (The Gothic & History of the English Language); and poetry comparison and descriptive writing (The Gothic). Many of these poems have been selected deliberately as they build upon topics and concepts taught in Year 7 such as Latin (The History of English Language) and propaganda (extracts from Animal Farm). Exploring these seminal poems will provide students with the opportunity to infer meaning; practise writing formal reading responses; expand their vocabulary with sophisticated subject terminology, while revising grammatical learning from KS2, such as word class and complex punctuation. This unit adopts a broad approach to assessment, giving students the opportunity to demonstrate their skills in poetry analysis, poetry comparison and descriptive writing. 

 

Following their study of poetry and creative writing, students will be exploring and analysing the famous play An Inspector Calls by J. B. Priestley, and considering the lessons it teaches us about the importance of community and looking after one another. Building upon their previous learning, the students will adapt their skills in independent research; close reading of a text, evaluating characters and exploring dramatic devices; debating as part of a team and planning and writing a detailed analysis. Studying this play will provide students the opportunity to discuss topical themes such as the significance of socialism, the debates surrounding capitalism; the relevance of family; and the responsibility of the individual. To develop a thorough understanding of Priestley’s text, the students will experiment with a variety of structured tasks including role play, reading aloud and writing with empathy (which also featured in Part 1 of this unit). Fortunately, this unit will allow the students to deepen their understanding of social, historical and cultural contexts (WW1 and 2) that they have established in part 1 of this unit. Not only that, the students will then adapt this knowledge to contemporary issues, such as migration and homelessness. As this unit draws to a close, all students will be asked to focus their analyses on a single character and respond to an evaluative question, based on a single character, in an extended essay-style response. This assessment is designed to highlight their inference skills and ability to sustain an academic style.  

 

Next, we move onto American writer John Steinbeck’s acclaimed novella Of Mice and Men. The novel captures a range of social and historical issues: poverty, racism, the impact of government on society, portrayal of female characters within literature and masculinity to name but a few. Students draw upon their knowledge of the critical analysis of texts, to further delve into the evaluation of Steinbeck’s plot and characters. Most importantly, this novel teaches our students about the strength of friendship, the importance of compassion and embracing diversity. Throughout the unit, the students will also use their knowledge of the culture and context of the novel, to craft and explore a range of travel writing. For example, the unit will look at modern day South America, and explore how life has changed for its residents. The students will also evaluate the impact Trump’s America had on the country, specifically in the region of California where the book is set, evaluating how far Steinbeck’s portrayal of America has moved on. In terms of assessment, students will draw upon their critical analysis skills to evaluate the theme of loneliness. They will also craft their own piece of travel writing, editing and drafting this piece of work.  

 

Year 9 

 

Year 9, begin the year by studying Arthur Miller’s seminal play, The Crucible. In this unit, students will explore the thematic topics of history, community, and truth. Written during the McCarthyism scare of the 1950s, the play underscores the importance of remembering the events of our collective past. In exploring the circumstances of the Salem witch trials, Miller raises questions about the devastating impact that corruption, herd mentality, and vengeance can have on a community. Whilst reading the play, their learning will link to a plethora of present-day issues such as fake news, cancel culture and herd mentality. In addition to the play, students will read several paired texts that add to their analysis of the core text. The non-fiction readings ‘Enemies from Withing’ and Aristotle’s ‘On Tragedy’ provide a foundation on which students can build their analysis of the play. And finally, Margaret Atwood’s poem “Half-Hanged Mary” allow students to explore similar themes in different genres. While reading and analysing the works of fiction and nonfiction in this unit, students will be working to develop their literary analysis skills, speaking and listening skills, and writing skills. 

 

Next, is the innovative unit ‘Women that Changed the World.’ Through this scheme, we take the pupils on a journey through the ages beginning with the renowned poet Christina Rossetti and her portrayal of women in Cousin Kate. The pupils will be educated through a range of poetry, prose and drama that cover a broad spectrum of historical issues such as sexism racism and inequality that underpin the amazing impact women have had on the world we live in today. Throughout this unit, the students revisit some of the powerful female characters we have encountered in Jane Eyre, this time comparing these characters to some of the other key figures we study. There will be opportunities for pupils to write for a variety of purposes, for instance, letter writing and diary entries to enable students to place themselves in the situation of some of the influential women studied. Moreover, students further develop their reading of non-fiction texts, particularly biographies and autobiographies, by comparing and evaluating the presentation of inspiring women such as, Malala Yousafzai, Maya Angelou and Jessica Ennis, to develop an awareness of the hardship each woman faced and their ability to overcome adversity. The students will then study the previous British Poet Laureate Carol Ann Duffy - the first LGBTQ+ person to hold the position - who has paved the way for other successful LGBT Poet Laureates. Students will draw upon their knowledge of Duffy’s poems by comparing their tone and messaged portrayed. Furthermore, there will be opportunities for students to plan verbal responses by using Standard English. They will be required to express their creativity by consciously crafting a rap, poem or story by implementing the range of writer’s methods through the plethora of texts studied. Finally, students will look at Emma Watson’s meaningful, ‘He for She’ Campaign speech and recognise the skills required to plan and perform a coherent speech. Students will be asked to use Standard English by giving a short speech, expressing their ideas of a key female role model in their lives, in a succinct but engaging manner. 

 

Finally, our Year 9 learners will study Malorie Blackman’s latest offering, Boys Don’t Cry. Through their study of this text, students will learn about the wider implications surrounding current issues such as single parenthood, teenage pregnancy, treatment of the LGBTQ+ community, race and sexuality; these may be issues they can relate to. Through critical thinking and philosophical discussions surrounding the themes raised in ‘Boys Don’t Cry’, they will deepen their understanding and knowledge of these topics. Students will be asked to empathise with the characters in the novel, and write a personal letter, but themselves in the character’s shoes. Students will draft and edit their writing, encouraging them to think about writer’s craft. The protagonist of this novel is a young boy, a direct comparison to the focus of the previous unit of study (Women that Changed the World)

 

Implementation:

 

Year

Term

Topic

Knowledge, skills and understanding

Window for Assessment

7

Autumn 1

History of English Language

Persuasive Speech

October

 

7

Autumn 2

Introduction the Gothic

Descriptive Writing

 

December

7

Spring

Study of a Pre 20th Century Text – Jane Eyre

Character Question 1 (Mr Brocklehurst)

Character Question 2 (Jane Eyre)

 

February

March

7

Summer

Shakespeare: Twelfth Night

Extract Question

Speaking and Listening task

May

July

8

Autumn

Shakespeare: Romeo and Juliet

Extract analysis

Character/theme question (essay style)

October

December

8

Spring

Conflict in Society

Crafting of own poem and written analysis

Exploration of staging and writer’s craft in An Inspector Call’s

February

March

8

Summer

Of Mice and Men/Travel Writing

 

Viewpoint Writing/Travel Writing

Essay Question (Character or Theme)

May

July

9

Autumn

Study of a Modern Drama: The Crucible

Transactional Writing – Writing an Article, expressing a Viewpoint

Character essay

October

 

December

9

Spring

Women that Changed the World

Non-Fiction comparative question

Transactional Writing

February

March

9

Summer

Study of a Modern Novel: Malorie Blackman’s Boys Don’t Cry

Transactional Writing – Writing a Personal Letter

Speaking and Listening Task

May

July

 

KS4 Intent:

 

At St Julie’s, our curriculum model allows for a creative and fun approach to the teaching of content, alongside the close drilling of skills. Each pupil has 3 lessons of English Literature and 2 lessons of English Language at KS4.  We begin Year 10 English Language lessons by looking at a range of non-fiction texts, reading and understanding how language is used to express a viewpoint or perspective. Throughout this unit, we are able to use texts that build on the pupils’ already strong appreciation of our rich and varied heritage. Through this study, students not only evaluate a writer’s work, but they are able to adapt their language and style to create their own piece of transactional writing. Pupils take this opportunity to do their required Speaking and Listening element of the course. Students take a topic that they are able to debate. Pupils, due to a real focus in KS3, are already adept in the arts of speaking and listening. Through this unit they get even more competent and fluent in public speaking. Students will spend time in both Year 10 and Year 11 reading and analysing language and structure in fiction texts. They learn about writer’s conscious crafting, making deliberate choices to create specific effects. They use this knowledge to craft their own creative writing pieces, both narrative and descriptive.

Throughout English Literature lessons at KS4, we have chosen the texts that we feel best allow the pupils to appreciate the depth and power of English Literary Heritage. During the autumn term of Year 10, the students study a pre-20th Century Novel: The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde. Due to their study of the Gothic genre at KS3, students can identify Gothic features and particularly how this would affect the Victorian reader. Set in Victorian London, pupils build upon knowledge of Victorian life studied when reading Jane Eyre at KS3, and focus specifically on the political and social climate of the novel. Over time, the students are able to build upon and advance their knowledge of grammar, vocabulary, and the crafting of texts, to evaluate plot, character and theme. Students in Year 10 then move on to the study of the renowned text Macbeth. The students are adept at exploring Shakespeare, due to their entitlement of study of two Shakespeare texts at KS3. Throughout this unit, students begin by understanding the contextual relevance of the drama; the pupils, through classroom teaching and their own sourcing of research and information, are able to use this knowledge to make an informed, personal response to the text. Students will also explore key aspects of the Tragedy genre and evaluate who is truly to blame for Macbeth’s demise. Finally, Year 10 students will explore poetry through the lens of a range of different genres, writers and eras. In their GCSE Literature exam, students must analyse two unseen poems, so this scheme allows them to focus on the skills needed to analyse language, structure and form in poetry. Students will consolidate their analytical skills further through the study of the Love and Relationships Anthology. Again, building on their KS3 understanding of the crafting of poems, each poem is looked at in turn, defining how language, form, and structure impacts on meaning.

 

In the autumn term of Year 11, students begin the study of Blood Brothers. Russell’s famed musical, based in Liverpool, is the perfect platform for our students to move their understanding and appreciation of the stage to a modern drama. Again, the pupils begin with a clear understanding of the social and political understanding of the play. They learn about the impact of Thatcher’s government on the working classes, the class and education system and the impact of nature and nurture on a child’s upbringing. Once again, the students use the deepened knowledge of context to explore, analyse and evaluate Russell’s writer’s craft. The study of a Shakespearean drama and Russell’s modern stage play enriches every pupil understanding of how words are ultimately defined by the context in which they were written. Through discussion, pupils can confidently, audibly, and effectively convey their viewpoints and attitudes toward the texts.

The remainder of Year 11 is spent revisiting prior units, with a key focus on pupils knowing and remembering more. Year 11 serves as a year of the mastery of skills. Lessons are engaging and creatively ensure that pupils are full prepared for not only the GCSE examinations, but for life. By the end of KS4, students can confidently communicate the power of language. The KS4 course allows each pupil to access the material; the most able pupils can master these skills and use them fluently and confidently across different subject areas and platforms.

 

Implementation:

 

Year

Term

Topic

Knowledge, skills and understanding

Window for Assessment

10

Autumn

English Language (Non-fiction analysis, comparison and evaluation)

 

English Language (Narrative Writing)

 

 

 

 

English Literature: 19th Century Novel (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)

Pupils master their skills of analysis and evaluation of non-fiction texts from both 19th and 21st Century extracts.

Pupils will then move to their own creative writing, this time planning, drafting, editing and proofreading their own narrative.

 

Pupils study Victorian Gothic novel The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde and further integrate their ability to evaluate plot, character and theme, using an in-depth knowledge of the impact of social and historical context. This is evidenced through the exploration of two different close readings of extracts from the novella.

 

 

October/December 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

October/December 2021

10

Spring

English Language (Analysis of Fiction texts; creative writing)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

English Language (Speech preparation and delivery)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

English Literature: Shakespeare (Macbeth)

Pupils master their skills of analysis and evaluation of fiction texts, alongside their own creation of a fiction texts. Pupils become more proficient at crafting their writing, thinking about the impact on their reader.

 

 

Pupils continue to master their skills of analysis and evaluation of non-fiction texts, alongside their own creation of a non-fiction texts. Pupils become more adept at their ability to craft their writing based on audience and style. Pupils can more confidently proofread and self-edit their responses by this point in their studies.

 

 

Pupils return to the study of Macbeth, focusing on a mastery of knowledge of plot, character and theme. Pupils are now confident in their ability to evaluate Shakespeare’s use of stagecraft.

 

February/March 2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

April/May 2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

February/March 2022

10

Summer

English Language (Non-fiction analysis; Transactional writing)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

English Literature (Unseen Poetry; Love and Relationships Anthology)

Pupils create their own non-fiction texts (letter, newspaper article, magazine column etc). Pupils become more adept at their ability to craft their writing based on audience and style.

 

 

Pupils continue to master their ability to comment on, analyse and evaluate the impact of language, form and structure on the reader. Pupils will showcase their skills by evaluating two different poems from the anthology. Pupils will then move onto their independent use of these skills, with the exploration of ‘Unseen Poetry. Pupils become more autonomous in their learning and responses by this point in their studies.

 

 

June/July 2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June/July 2022

11

Autumn

English Language (Explorations in Creative Reading and Writing)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

English Literature Modern play (Blood Brothers)

Pupils master their skills of analysis and evaluation of fiction texts, alongside their own creation of a fiction texts. Pupils become more adept at their ability to craft their writing, thinking about the impact on their reader.

 

Pupils study modern play Blood Brothers by local playwright Willy Russell and further integrate their ability to evaluate plot, character and theme, using an in-depth knowledge of the impact of social and historical context.

Oct/Dec 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oct/Dec 2021

11

Spring

English Language (Writer’s Viewpoints and Perspectives)

 

 

 

 

 

English Language (Explorations in Creative Reading and Writing)

 

 

 

 

 

 

English Literature (Mastery and Consolidation of content, knowledge and skills)

Pupils will return to focusing on how and why writer’s craft their writing for the purpose of their reader. Pupils will explain and analysis writer’s methods.

 

 

Pupils master their skills of analysis and evaluation of fiction texts, alongside their own creation of a fiction texts. Pupils become more adept at their ability to craft their writing, thinking about the impact on their reader.

 

 

Pupils return to the study of Macbeth, focusing on a mastery of knowledge of plot, character and theme. Pupils are now confident in their ability to evaluate Shakespeare’s use of stagecraft. Pupils will become more confident in the close analysis and exploration of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde. Poetry is also explored, consolidating the skill of approaching a poem (unseen and within the Love and Relationships anthology).

February/March 2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

April/May 2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

April/May 2022

11

Summer

English Language (Mastery and Consolidation unit)

 

 

 

 

 

 

English Literature (Mastery and Consolidation unit)

 

 

Pupils will become autonomous in their ability to analyse, comment on and evaluate both Fiction and Non-Fiction Texts.

 

Pupils gain further confidence in their ability to evaluate the impact of writer’s methods in the range of texts studied.

 

May 2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

May 2022

 

KS5 Intent:

 

In year 12 and 13, St Julie’s offer two KS5 courses: English Literature and English Language and Literature. Both units allow pupils to develop academic autonomy. Students become adept at making critical, perceptive, and evaluative comments in a literary or stylistic manner. Our teaching focuses on the pupils being able to independently and creatively respond to texts.

Our A-level English Language and Literature scheme draws on the academic field of Stylistics in order to create an integrated English Language and Literature course which brings together literary and non-literary discourses. This study integrates literary and linguistic fields via shared concepts about the way language choices create representations, both in literary and non-literary texts: words create worlds, both in literature and elsewhere. Using literary and linguistic concepts and methods, students analyse literary and non-literary texts in a range of modes and genres, in the process gaining insights into the nature of different discourses and ideas about creativity. Students develop skills as producers and interpreters of language by creating texts themselves and critically reflecting on their own processes of production. At St Julie’s, the course begins with an introduction to Stylistics, by way of the Paris Anthology. This is the study of an anthology of non-literary texts. Pupils are taught to look closely at their ‘literariness’ and evaluate the concepts and methods used by writer’s. Simultaneously, with their other class teacher, students read Atwood’s acclaimed novel The Handmaid’s Tale. Through the study of the novel, the pupils engage with how Atwood has created this unnerving, dystopic world. Students then move onto Duffy’s Anthology ‘Mean Time.’ Pupils build on their newfound knowledge of stylistics to interpret the challenging and powerful poetry of Duffy. Students also begin their study of the famed novella The Great Gatsby. Pupils consolidate two skills: the ability to interpret a text and creatively produce additional material in line with the writer’s style. This is done at this part of the course, as pupils now have a good base knowledge of a range of texts and how to approach them stylistically. Year 12 students are introduced to the NEA (Non-Examined Assessment) section of the course by the end of year 12. Students are now more confident in their stylistic analysis skills. They choose their own texts in this unit to produce a 3000-word investigative account. Examples of essays in the past are ‘An investigation into how language is used to manipulate in 1984 and Donald Trump’s inauguration speech.’

In A Level English Literature, the students gain a solid understanding of how texts can be connected and how they can be interpreted in multiple ways so that students can arrive at their own interpretations and become confident autonomous readers. Students are then not only equipped with the knowledge and skills needed for the course but also experience a rich approach to English literature that provides an excellent basis for studying the subject at university. The specification encourages the exploration of texts in a number of different ways: the study of texts within specific genres; the study of texts through engagement with a range of theoretical ideas; writing about texts in a number of different ways. Students begin with the study of the tragic genre through Shakespeare’s acclaimed Othello. All KS5 students already have a sound understanding of how to critically analyse Shakespearean Literature. They build on this contextual and theoretical understanding to give innovative and perceptive responses to the text. Simultaneously, students begin their study of The Kite Runner through the lens of social protest writing. Students are required to study the book, look critically at the writer’s methods and how they are used to show the oppression and struggle of the people of Afghanistan. This study serves as an excellent enrichment of a modern political issue incorporated with how writer’s use literature to portray to plight of a sector of society. The study of the tragic genre continues with the acclaimed gothic novel Tess of the d’Urbervilles. Students have a well-established understanding of the Victorian gothic, due to teaching across KS3 and KS4. Students now use this base knowledge to turn a critical eye at to how this novel is both gothic and tragic. At this point in the course, students begin their NEA (Non-Examined Assessment) Pupils must produce a critical investigation of a prose and poetry text of their choice. Pupils study the texts independently looking at different strands of critical argument e.g. Feminism, Marxism. Students are able to produce work independently as they have become more proficient at these skills in earlier modules of the course. Pupils must Next, pupils look closely at the Ibsen’s translated text of A Doll’s House. Pupils build on their critical and evaluative skills, again look at social protest writing. The students question the plight of numerous characters and question the impact of the restrictive and oppressive Victorian doctrines on society, in this domestic sphere. Lastly, students look at Death of a Salesman and William Blake’s poetry. Pupil have by this point, well established their ability to critically evaluate writer’s methods.

The distribution of each of the A Level courses allows for each unit to be revisited across the course and skills to be mastered. Pupils finish their KS5 English course as independent, critical, creative evaluative readers and writers, skills that can be transferred to numerous lines of employment.

Implementation: A Level English Language and Literature

 

Year

Term

Topic

Knowledge, skills and understanding

Window for Assessment

12

Autumn

Teacher 1: Paris Anthology

 

 

 

 

Teacher 2: A Handmaid’s Tale

Pupils will be able to:

Explore the impact of writer’s methods in extracts from the Paris Anthology

Confidently use language levels in their exploration and analysis

Explore the impact of writer’s methods in A Handmaid’s Tale

Confidently use language levels in their exploration and analysis

Explore the impact of context of the way in which reader’s engage with the text

Confidently engage with A Handmaid’s Tale as a Dystopia

 

 

 

October/December 2021

 

 

 

 

October/ December 2021

12

Spring

Teacher 1: Paris Anthology/Great Gatsby

 

 

 

 

 

 

Teacher 2: Duffy’s Mean Time

Pupils will be able to:

Explore the impact of writer’s methods in extracts from the Paris Anthology, using language levels fluently to explore and analyse

Explore the impact of writer’s methods in Great Gatsby and use this knowledge to creatively craft their own writing.

Explore the impact of writer’s methods in Duffy’s Mean Time

Confidently use language levels in their exploration and analysis

 

 

February/ March 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

February/ March 2021

 

12

Summer

Teacher 1: NEA/Great Gatsby

 

 

 

 

Teacher 2: NEA/ Streetcar Named Desire

Pupils will be able to:

Explore the impact of writer’s methods in Great Gatsby and use this knowledge to creatively craft their own writing.

Explore the impacts of writer’s methods in Great Gatsby

Confidently use language levels in their exploration and analysis

Explore the impact of writer’s methods in Streetcar Named Desire.

Confidently use language levels in their exploration and analysis

In both units, pupils will study the contextual background of each work, and be able to fluently integrate this understanding into their work.

May/June 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

May /June 2021

 

13

Autumn

Teacher 1: Streetcar Named Desire/NEA

 

 

 

Teacher 2: Gatsby/Paris Anthology

Pupils will be able to:

Explore the impact of writer’s methods in Streetcar Named Desire.

Confidently use language levels in their exploration and analysis

With confidence and independence, explore the impact of writer’s methods in Great Gatsby and use this knowledge to creatively craft their own writing.

With confidence and independence, explore the impact of writer’s methods in extracts from the Paris Anthology

Confidently use language levels in their exploration and analysis

October/ December 2021

 

 

 

October/December 2021

13

Spring

Teacher 1: Duffy Anthology/Handmaid’s Revision

Teacher 2: Paris Anthology/Gatsby

Pupils will be able to:

Explore the impact of writer’s methods in Duffy’s Mean Time

Confidently use language levels in their exploration and analysis

With confidence and independence, explore the impact of writer’s methods in A Handmaid’s Tale

Confidently use language levels in their exploration and analysis

Explore the impact of context of the way in which reader’s engage with the text

Confidently engage with A Handmaid’s Tale as a Dystopia. At this point, pupils will be fluently be able to discuss the impact of narrative methods on the creation of Atwood’s storyworld.

Explore the impact of writer’s methods in extracts from the Paris Anthology, with confidence

Proficiently use language levels in their exploration and analysis

Explore the impact of writer’s methods in Great Gatsby and use this knowledge to creatively craft their own writing.

Explore the impact of writer’s methods in Great Gatsby

February

March

February

March

13

Summer

Teacher 1: Revision of all Units

Teacher 2: Revision of all Units

Pupils will be able to more autonomously tackle, evaluate and create texts.

May 2021

 

 Implementation: A Level English Literature

 

Year

Term

Topic

Knowledge, skills and understanding

Window for Assessment

12

Autumn

Teacher 1: Othello

 

 

 

 

 

Teacher 2: The Kite Runner

Pupils will:

Begin to engage with debate on the text and connect the text to the genre of Tragedy.

Begin to form an understanding of the elements of a Shakespearean tragedy and use literary concepts and terminology.

Start to engage with debate with The Kite Runner and connect the text to the genre of Political and Social Protest.

Form an understanding of the elements of the genre and use literary concepts and terminology.

Gain a thorough understanding of the political backdrop of the novel and use this understanding to engage with the text.

In both units, pupils will begin to write in an academic fashion, evaluating writer’s methods in an articulate manner.

October/December 2020

 

 

 

 

 

October/December 2020

12

Spring

Teacher 1: Tess of the d’Urbervilles

 

 

 

 

 

 

Teacher 2: A Doll’s House

Pupils will

Begin to engage with debate in relation to Tess of the d’Uberville and connect the text to the genre of Tragedy. Take their understanding of tragedy from the previous unit and apply this knowledge to the novel. More confidently be able to use literary concepts and terminology that are relevant to the line of discussion.

Begin to engage with debate with A Doll’s House and connect the text to the genre of Political and Social Protest.

Build upon their understanding of the elements of the genre and use literary concepts and terminology.

Gain a thorough understanding of the political backdrop of the drama and use this understanding to engage with the text.

In both units, pupils will begin to write in an academic fashion, evaluating writer’s methods in an articulate manner.

February/March 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

February/March 2021

12

Summer

Teacher 1: Death of a Salesman/Introduction to NEA Prose

Teacher 2: William Blake/An Introduction to NEA Poetry

Pupils will:

Begin to engage with debate in relation to Death of a Salesman and connect the text to the genre of Tragedy. Take their understanding of tragedy from the previous unit and apply this knowledge to the drama.

More confidently be able to use literary concepts and terminology that are relevant to the line of discussion. Gain a sound understanding of the American backdrop of the drama and become knowledgeable about the political issues such as Capitalism.

Begin to engage with debate William Blake’s Anthology and connect the text to the genre of Political and Social Protest. Pupils will now have sound understanding of the elements of the genre and use literary concepts and terminology with confidence.

Gain a thorough understanding of the political backdrop of the drama and use this understanding to engage with the text. Pupils can use their knowledge from the previous study of this era to inform ideas.

In both units, pupils will begin to write in an academic fashion, evaluating writer’s methods in an articulate manner.

May/June 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

May /June 2021

 

13

Autumn

Teacher 1: Death of a Salesman/NEA Prose

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Teacher 2: A Doll’s House/NEA Poetry

Pupils will:

Continue to engage in debate in relation to Death of a Salesman and connect the text to the genre of Tragedy.

Take their understanding of tragedy from the previous unit and apply this knowledge to the drama.

More confidently be able to use literary concepts and terminology that are relevant to the line of discussion. Gain a sound understanding of the American backdrop of the drama and become knowledgeable about the political issues such as Capitalism.

Return to the exploration of Ibsen’s A Doll’s House and connect the text to the genre of Political and Social Protest. Pupils will use their prior knowledge of the elements of the genre and use literary concepts and terminology.

Gain a thorough understanding of the political backdrop of the drama and use this understanding to engage with the text.

In all units, pupils will begin to write in an academic fashion, evaluating writer’s methods in an articulate manner.

 

October/ December 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

October/December 2021

13

Spring

Teacher 1: Tess of the d’Urbervilles/Section C

Teacher 2: Blake/Unseen

 

Teacher 1: Othello

Teacher 2: The Kite Runner/Section C

Pupils will be able to more autonomously: evaluate writer’s methods, use literary concepts and methods, use aspects of the specified genre to engage in debate about the texts.

February 2021

 

 

 

March 2021

13

Summer

Teacher 1: Revision of all units

Teacher 2: Revision of all units

Pupils will continue to master their autonomous evaluation of writer’s methods, use of literary concepts and methods and the use of specified ge

May 2021