Curriculum Area: Religious Education

Overview:

According to Pope St John Paul II, RE is the "core of the core curriculum" in a Catholic school and it is helping St Julie’s to fulfil its mission to educate the whole person in discerning the meaning of their existence. The RE Curriculum Directory (2012 p4) stated that: “Without religious education, students would be deprived of an essential element of their formation and personal development, which helps them attain a vital harmony between faith and culture." Religion shapes our everyday life from politics and art to law and international relations, and a lack of religious literacy can lead to intolerance and hatred. RE is a core subject at St Julie’s and is at the heart of our school community.

KS3 Intent:

The KS3 RE curriculum is determined by the Bishops of England and Wales as presented in the RE Curriculum Directory (2012). Students will follow the People of God syllabus which links directly to, and builds on, the Come and See curriculum used in Catholic primary schools in the Archdiocese of Liverpool. There is a logically agreed sequence to the topics studied and each one builds on prior learning, as work becomes more challenging as ‘terms’ progress. There is flexibility within the topics to allow for students in ‘our school’ to develop their own skills and to explore topics of interest to our students as a Notre Dame school. The curriculum is differentiated allowing for equality of access for all students and the sequencing of units is regularly reviewed to match ambition and to ensure a clear rationale for learning and teaching. As a Catholic Christian community, the focus is on Church and Gospel values in our modern world but students will also explore other World Religions, namely Hinduism, Judaism and Islam, in recognition of the UK as a multifaith and multicultural society and of a Church which looks outwards and not inwards. Regular revision coupled with mid and end of unit assessments, encourage students to know and remember more, whilst reflecting on their own faith journeys.

Implementation:

Year

Term

Topic

Knowledge, skills and understanding

Window for Assessment

7

1

Community

 

What is Jesus like?

Students are welcomed into Year 7 by exploring the themes of identity and community as they learn about their new school and the Sisters of Notre Dame. They will explore the importance of Jesus in society as a whole and the impact of his ministry and teachings on the Christian community today.

Three assessments per term using Assessment Without Levels (AWL) – one will be a ‘book-based’ assessment.

7

2

The Kingdom of God

 

Signs of Catholic Christian Identity

As the Christian community has developed, their emphasis has been on establishing God’s Kingdom here on earth. Students will explore what the Kingdom is and how Jesus described whilst pointing to teachings about the end of time. They will investigate how the Catholic Church believes we can meet God in the world today through the Sacraments and support students as they investigate the signs of Catholic identity through, for example, baptism. 

Three assessments per term using AWL – one will be a ‘book-based’ assessment.

7

3

Hinduism

 

The Covenant Story

Christianity is the largest of the World Religions, but it is important that students learn to respect and understand the views and beliefs of others. Hinduism is the oldest of the six main World Religions and for this reason students will research, explore and empathise with Hindus as they study this religion. The year will finish with a study of the Covenant Story which ensures that students understand the relationship between humans and God and how this developed across the Old Testament. 

Three assessments per term using AWL – one will be the end of year exam.

8

1

Judaism

 

The New Covenant

 

Serving Others

Year 8 starts with a unit on Judaism which allows students to make the connection with the Covenant Story from Year 7 and with the origins of the Christian faith through Jesus as the New Covenant. Students will explore the call for Christians to be ‘servants of others’ by following the example of Jesus in their own lives.

Three assessments per term using AWL – one will be a ‘book-based’ assessment.

8

2

Building the Kingdom of God

 

Forgiveness and Reconciliation

In Year 7, students learnt about the Kingdom of God and what this means in terms of heaven; in Year 8 they will explore how Christians can build God’s Kingdom today, here on earth. They will understand how Christians can receive healing through the Sacraments of the Sick and Reconciliation with a practical look at the work of the HCPT in Liverpool.

Three assessments per term using AWL – one will be a ‘book-based’ assessment.

8

3

Catholic Social Teaching

 

Islam and Christianity

St James said that faith without action was useless and therefore learning about Catholic Social Teaching is of vital importance for students. They will explore the teachings on and the practicalities of love, justice and peace in our world today and will investigate the lasting impact of Sister Dorothy Stang and her work on the environment and climate change. The year will finish with the study of Islam, the second largest faith in the UK focusing on key themes such as: belief in one God, prayer and worship, the Prophet Muhammad, rituals, festivals and the Five Pillars.

Three assessments per term using AWL – one will be the end of year exam.

9

1

Crime and Punishment

 

Community Cohesion

 

Suffering, Evil, Death and the Afterlife

 

Crime and Punishment: students will explore the need for law and order in UK society to create a fair and just society using punishments for offenders. They will examine calls for the re-introduction of corporal and capital punishment formulating and expressing their own views after considering the views of Catholic Christianity. They will consider the causes of crime before examining the law on drugs and alcohol and the social and health implications on society. The unit will conclude with a study of Christian attitudes to drugs and alcohol.

Community Cohesion: students will build on the purpose and consequences of crime and punishment by investigating the importance of community cohesion and their place in the local, national and global community. They will start by exploring the roles of men and women in society and what the Church says. They will examine Britain as a multifaith and multicultural society reflecting on the benefits and possible drawbacks. Students will examine Christian duty with regards asylum seekers, creating racial and social harmony and welcoming people of other faiths and none. The unit will conclude with an examination of how religious issues surrounding community cohesion are presented through a variety of UK media considering balance and fairness. 

Suffering, Evil, Death and the Afterlife: this unit completes KS3. Students will explore what evil and suffering are in our world today before considering Christian and non-Christian responses to why it is exists and how to deal with it. They will examine Christian and non-Christian beliefs in life after death including opinions on the paranormal. Students will develop their understanding of why some people do not believe in an afterlife before exploring ethical issues related to sanctity of life through such topics as fertility treatment. The unit will close with students critically analysing how Christian responses to suffering, evil, death and the afterlife are presented by the media in the UK.

Students will complete 3 assessments this term, one at the conclusion to each unit of work – Oct, Nov and Dec.

 

KS4 Intent

The curriculum at Key Stage 4 builds on the work started at KS3 and, once again, it follows the guidelines laid down by the Bishops of England and Wales. At St Julie’s, students will start the GCSE in the January of Year 9, thereby allowing enough time for students to explore units in greater depth and to allow for the development of SMSC across the learning experiences. Regular revision coupled with mid and end of unit assessments, encourage students to know and remember more, whilst reflecting on their own faith journeys. The curriculum is differentiated allowing for equality of access for all students and the sequencing of units is regularly reviewed to match ambition and to ensure a clear rationale for learning and teaching. As a Catholic Christian community, the key focus is on Church and Gospel values but within a modern world; students will also explore Judaism and how this has influenced Christianity today.   

Implementation

Year

Term

Topic

Knowledge, skills and understanding

Window for Assessment

9

2

Creation

 

 

Creation: The Creation unit addresses the most fundamental questions at the heart of religion and so is the natural place to start the course. Students begin by examining the origins and structure of the Bible, since this is where Christians draw many of their answer to those questions from, before analysing the Genesis creation stories and what they reveal about the nature of God and humans. These stories are then interpreted in light of different views regarding inspiration and the Bible as the word of God, and an examination of Catholic attitudes to science allows for a possible re-evaluation of the purpose of the Genesis creation accounts. A study of Michelangelo’s Creation of Adam, alongside other Christian art that depicts creation, helps to further draw out an understanding of the significance of the creation stories for Catholics, especially in regard to themes such as dignity of the human person and image of God. A study of natural law emphasises the Catholic belief in the essential goodness of God’s creation before a focus on stewardship, care for the environment and sustainability allow for reflection on the practical implications of the belief in creation in terms of how it ought to impact on individual and collective responsibilities and behaviour.

Students will receive assessments at the mid and endpoint of each unit of work.

 

Double assessments will be used at the end of future units to allow students to remember earlier study at KS4, to keep learning fresh.

 

In essence, students will be assessed on a monthly basis to aid memory and serve ambition.

 

Mid-Unit Assessment – Week 18

End of Unit Assessment – Week 21

9

2

Incarnation

Having looked at God as creative Father in the first unit, students now develop an understanding of Jesus as God Incarnate, starting with a study of the scriptural origins of this belief especially in God’s message to Joseph and to Mary. The concept of Jesus as Word of God reinforces this belief and allows for a link back to the Genesis creation story where God’s word was present, showing Jesus to be eternal. This leads into a study of Jesus as fully God and fully human as portrayed in the Gospel accounts of his birth, life, death and resurrection, with an opportunity to consider different understandings of the Incarnation. Tradition and the teachings of St Irenaeus about Jesus then reinforce orthodox Catholic teaching on the Incarnation. Now that students are secure in their understanding of Catholic teaching, they can then look at how incarnation affects Catholic attitudes to religious art, including interpreting statues of Jesus and Christian symbols. A study of the moral teachings of Jesus shows how a truly incarnational theology reminds us that God is present in each person we encounter – which leads naturally into grace and the sacramental nature of reality, with a further focus on the seven sacraments as means of receiving God’s grace at key points in life. Finally, imago dei and abortion reaffirms the Catholic teaching that all are created in God’s image and that the unborn are deserving of protection, as Jesus himself once was.

Mid-Unit Assessment – Week 26

 

End of Unit Assessment – Week 29

9

3

The Triune God

 

Revision

The Triune God: Having looked at units on Creation (emphasising God as creative Father) and Incarnation (emphasising God as Son), students are now able to relate these concepts to the doctrine of the Trinity, starting by looking at the Triune God explained in the Bible so they can identify the source of this belief. They can then move on to look at the authority of the magisterium to interpret and clarify biblical teachings on Trinity, especially via the Nicene Creed.  Identifying the presence of the Triune God in the accounts of Jesus’ baptism illustrates the meaning and significance of baptism as a sacrament of initiation. By reflecting on the teachings of St Augustine and Catherine LaCugna in relation to The Trinity and God’s love, students can then see the influence of Trinity on Christians today in spreading God’s love through mission and evangelism. The final part of the unit then looks at music in worship through psalms, the liturgy and acclamations used in the Mass, before finishing with a study of traditional and spontaneous prayer and postures used in prayer. All of these are to be understood in their context as expressions of the belief in the Triune nature of God.

Revision: at the mid-point of the KS4 programme students will have the opportunity to reflect on prior learning through a series of revision lessons. These will coincide with whole-school mock examinations to allow students to evaluate and assess ambition.

There will be a mid and end of unit assessment for Triune God in May and July.

 

Revision will coincide with Year 9 mock exams.

 

Mid-Unit Assessment – Week 33

 

End of Unit Assessment – Week 36

10

1

Redemption

 

 

Redemption: students will explore conscience as a reminder of how free will can lead people to turn away from God; restoration through sacrifice emphasises how despite our tendency to turn away from God, the death of Jesus was God’s key redemptive act; this leads on to the story of redemption as portrayed in the Bible through the accounts of Jesus’ death, burial resurrection and ascension; and the events of Pentecost. This salvation history is then illustrated through the metaphors of Irenaeus and Anselm. The concepts of salvation past, present and future lead onto the meaning and significance of Eucharist for Catholics and prayers and adoration in the Mass as an expression of the story of redemption. Comparing the meaning and significance of Eucharist in other denominations helps to reinforce the centrality of the Mass in Catholic worship and understanding how the main parts of the Church and wider Church architecture are expressions of Catholic belief.

Students will participate in a mid and end-point assessment for each unit of work. A double assessment will be used at the end of the Redemption unit to allow students to remember more and to keep earlier units memorable.

In essence, students will be assessed on a monthly basis to aid memory and ambition.

Mid-Unit Assessment – Week 4

End of Unit Assessment – Week 7

10

1

Church and Kingdom of God

Church and Kingdom of God: Starting with the Stations of the Cross follows on from the previous Redemption Unit where students look at the features of church and introduces the idea of journey. This leads naturally into pilgrimage, which is also an opportunity to compare pilgrimage as an act of worship with other acts of worship from previous units e.g. prayer; eucharist; music)

The focus on Rome as place of pilgrimage opens up discussion about the hierarchical structure of the Church with the Pope as Bishop of Rome as its head. A study of Vatican 2 gives a practical example of how this hierarchy works in practice. This basis enables students to then study the four marks of the Church and the Church’s conciliar and pontifical nature to deepen their understanding.

A study of Catholic Social teaching and the concepts of Body of Christ/charity then help to demonstrate the practical impact of the Church.

A study of the Magnificat and Lord's Prayer as examples of Kingdom Prayers helps students to reflect on the idea that building the Kingdom is in many ways the main task of the Church and its members This then leads naturally on to signs of the Kingdom and Kingdom Values to help pupils to understand what building the kingdom looks like in practice

Mission and evangelism in drama show how the task of building the kingdom has been represented through the creative arts – and allows for links back the learning on mission and evangelism in the Trinity unit.

Mid-Unit Assessment – Week 11

 

End of Unit Assessment – Week 15

10

2

Eschatology

 

Revision

Eschatology: Starting with eschatology and life after death introduces the fundamental beliefs that will underpin everything else studied in the unit; this then leads into the four last things to develop a more specific understanding about Catholic beliefs relating to eschatology and life after death; purgatory and judgement is the natural follow on as it gives further development to the previous topic; this then leads into a study of Michelangelo’s 'The Last Judgement' as a visual representation of those beliefs about judgement and life after death and The Parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus as a further reflection on those beliefs; the Church's teachings on the end of time gives a more contemporary expression of these beliefs and cosmic reconciliation demonstrates the fulfilment of beliefs about the end of time; the last rites, the funeral rites, the paschal candle and memorials for the dead show how Catholic practices reflect the beliefs that have previously been studied; the care of the dying and euthanasia rounds off the unit with an opportunity to link back to previous knowledge such as imago dei from the Creation Unit

 

Revision: at the mid-point of their KS4 experience all students will be given the opportunity to reflect on and the revise the three topics covered to date, namely: Creation, Incarnation and the Triune God. This will link to the whole school mock assessments.

Mid-Unit Assessment – Week 19

 

End of Unit Assessment – Week 22

10

3

Religion, Relationships and Family

 

 

Religion, Relationships and Family: in this unit, students will consider humans as sexual beings exploring the significance of male and female from a Biblical context. They will examine Pope John Paul II’s Theology of the Body and ask whether the Church is out of date with modern society. They will examine society’s view on human sexuality and compare it to the teachings of the Catholic Church They will reflect on the importance of modern-day marriage and whether vows are still relevant. They will scrutinise different views, Church and non-Church, on such issues as: contraception, cohabitation, annulment, divorce and remarriage, being encouraged to formulate their own views in a fair and balanced manner. They will judge the nature and purpose of the family; examine the changing dimensions of gender roles and the importance of family planning and compare this with gender equality in the Bible and in wider society today. Students will complete the unit by considering why gender prejudice and discrimination exist and ask whether enough is being done in the UK and by the Church at large to combat it.

Mid-Unit Assessment – Week 26

 

End of Unit Assessment – Week 30

10

3

Religion, Peace and Conflict

Religion, Peace and Conflict: it is important that students are given the opportunity to investigate conflict in our world today. This unit allows students to examine why conflicts and wars begin and how they can be resolved peacefully. They will scrutinise why bullying occurs and ask whether forgiveness and reconciliation are possible. Students will use scripture to justify war whilst exploring why we all search for justice and feel aggrieved when it is not forthcoming. Students will question whether any way can ever be just in the context of the Just War Theory and judge the impact of nuclear war and weapons of mass destruction on God’s creation. Students will explore the consequences of war and ask whether religion should ever be used as an excuse for violence and conflict. Students will consider whether Christians should be pacifists and if this is what Jesus taught. They will research modern conflicts and apply their learning about justice leading to an exploration of terrorism and torture and the dangers of radicalisation and extremism and ask whether they can ever be justified either within Christianity or the country. The unit will conclude on a positive note as students research conflict resolution through the work of Pax Christi and the Justice and Peace Commission and question how they are putting their faith into action.

Mid-Unit Assessment – Week 34

 

End of Unit Assessment – Week 38

11

1

Judaism: Jewish Beliefs and Teachings

 

 

Judaism: Jewish Beliefs and Teachings: students will explore the fundamental beliefs and teachings that underpin the Jewish faith. They will begin by examining the nature of God through ‘One, Creator and Lawgiver’. These ideas reveal something of the relationship that Jews have with God and students will examine similarities and differences with Christianity. This belief in God will lead students to answer questions about life after death, judgement and resurrection reflecting on why and how Jews disagree in their beliefs today. Jews do not believe that the Messiah has arrived, and students will investigate different interpretations of Messiahship in modern day Judaism leading to an exploration of prophecy through the Covenant story with a key focus on Abraham and Moses. This understanding of Covenant will lead students to justify key moral principles in Judaism within the context of sanctity of life reflecting on how this will impact on everyday behaviour. Students will complete the unit by examining the concept of free will and what this means in the context of the mitzvot and its impact on Jewish relationships both with God and with each other. 

Mid-Unit Assessment – Week 4

 

End of Unit Assessment – Week 8

11

1

Judaism: Jewish Practices

Jewish Practices: students will build on their learning about Jewish beliefs and to understand how these become rituals and customs in their everyday lives through studying a range of Jewish practices. For Jews, the synagogue is at the heart of the community and for this reason, students will study the impact of the synagogue. They will demonstrate learning on key features and architecture before exploring how Orthodox and Reform Jews differ in their styles of worship. Students will reflect on the importance of prayer and services in the Jewish community and it can unite traditional and contemporary views. For Jews, the most important part of any week is the Sabbath and so students will explore how it is celebrated at home and in the synagogue comparing customs with life in the UK today. Students will investigate the life cycle of Jewish rituals through birth ceremonies, Bar and Bat Mitzvah, marriage and mourning for the dead. These ceremonies and customs will give students a real insight into the importance of ritual for many Jews. Keeping God at the centre of life, is vital for many Jews and students will examine the concept of kosher and how it impacts on more than just food laws. The unit will conclude for students by reflecting on the importance of festivals; how and why they are celebrated and understand why they take on a deeper meaning in light of the Holocaust.

Mid-Unit Assessment – Week 12

 

End of Unit Assessment – Week 15

11

2

Recall. Recap. Revise.

Revision: students will revisit the whole course during this term starting with units from Year 9. The focus will be on identifying areas of weakness across the KS4 programme and eradicating misconceptions. Assessment will be on-going with a focus on 1, 2, 4, 5 and 12-mark style questions.

There will be on-going in class assessment after completion of the course focusing content and assessment structure; these will sometimes be under timed conditions.

11

3

Recall. Recap. Revise.

Revision: In this shortened term students will fully complete the KS4 pathway through terminal assessments.

Terminal assessments – May.

KS5 Intent (A Level)

In Years 12 and 13, St Julie’s students who have chosen to follow the A level Religious Studies pathway will examine three key components: Philosophy of Religion, Religion and Ethics and The Study of Christianity and Dialogues. The course is fully essay based and excellent preparation for undergraduate study in course such as Philosophy and Theology. Due to the nature of the course, components are taught simultaneously by subject specialists with built in opportunities to revisit earlier units and topics. The curriculum follows a logical order beginning with the Existence of God for Philosophy and Ethics as Moral Philosophy and these underpin the course and permeate the entire curriculum. A range of skills will be developed, including essay writing, critical analysis, evaluation and demonstration of knowledge and understanding of religion and belief with reference to Christianity.   

 Implementation:

Year

Term

Topic

Knowledge, skills and understanding

Window for Assessment

12

1 - 2

Philosophy

Students must develop knowledge and understanding of the following:

  • the meaning and significance of the specified content including: Arguments for the existence of God, Evil and Suffering and Religious Experience.
  • the influence of these beliefs and teachings on individuals, communities and societies
  • the cause and significance of similarities and differences in beliefs and teachings
  • the approach of philosophy to the study of religion and belief.

They should be able to analyse and evaluate issues arising from the topics studied, and the views and arguments of the scholars prescribed for study in the specification including: Paley, Hume, Aquinas, Griffin, James and Stance.

Students should also be able to use specialist language and terminology appropriately.

  1. Essay: Arguments for the existence of God
  2. Essay: Evil and Suffering
  3. Essay: Religious Experience 

Some assessments will be set as homework, but students will also be given timed assessments in class to work on their exam techniques. Assessments should also include topics from year 12 which ensures students are revisiting these topics throughout the year.

In Feb/Mar, students will take their Mock Exams – there will be a 3-hour Philosophy and Ethics paper.

12

1 - 2

Ethics

Normative ethical theories: Students will explore the deontological ethical theory of natural moral law with reference to Aquinas which they touched upon at GCSE. They will also explore and apply the principle of the double effect, as well as the theory of proportionalism. Students will then study the teleological theory of situation ethics with reference to Fletcher. Students will revisit Jesus’ moral teachings within this topic. The third and final normative ethical theory that students will study is the theory of virtue ethics with reference to Aristotle. Students will analyse and evaluate the differing views and arguments (put forward by relevant scholars) surrounding these three ethical theories.

 

Once students have examined, analysed and evaluated the three normative theories, they will then consider the approaches taken to moral decision making by these ethical theories. Students will start by applying these theories to the issues of theft and lying.

 

Students will then move on to look at the differing approaches taken to moral decision making by these ethical theories. Students will apply these theories to the following human issues; embryo research, abortion, voluntary euthanasia/assisted suicide, and capital punishment.

Students will conclude Year 1 ethics by looking at the differing approaches of these ethical theories to various animal issues. They will apply the three ethical theories to the following animal issues: intensive farming, the use of animals in scientific procedures, blood sports, and animals as a source of organs for transplants (xenotransplantation).

1: Natural Moral Law 

2: Situation Ethics A

3: Virtue Ethics 

4: Application Lying/ Stealing 

5: Application Human Issues 

6: Application Animal Issues 

 

Some assessments will be set as homework, but students will also be given timed assessments in class to work on their exam techniques. Assessments will also include topics from across Year 12 which will ensure that students are revisiting these topics throughout the year.

 

In Feb/Mar, students will take their Mock Exams – there will be a 3-hour Philosophy and Ethics paper.

12

3

Christianity

Students are required to study those aspects of the religious beliefs, teachings, values and practices of Christianity outlined in the specification and the different ways in which these are expressed in the lives of individuals, communities and societies.

They should develop a knowledge and critical understanding of:

  • the specified material e.g. Sources of Wisdom and Authority, God, Self, Death and the afterlife, Good Conduct and Key Moral Principles.
  • how the texts specified for study are interpreted and applied e.g. the significance of John 10:30; 1 Corinthians 8:6
  • the influence of beliefs and teachings on individuals, communities and societies
  • the causes, meanings and significance of similarities and differences in religious thought belief and practice within Christianity
  • approaches to the study of religion and belief.

They should be able to analyse and evaluate issues arising from the topics studied, and the views and arguments of the scholars prescribed for study.

  1. Essay: Sources of Wisdom and Authority
  2. Essay: God
  3. Essay: Good Conduct and Key Moral Principles

13

1

 

Students must develop knowledge and understanding of the following:

  • the meaning and significance of the specified content including: Religious Language, Miracles, Self, Death and Afterlife
  • the influence of these beliefs and teachings on individuals, communities and societies
  • the cause and significance of similarities and differences in beliefs and teachings
  • the approach of philosophy to the study of religion and belief.

They should be able to analyse and evaluate issues arising from the topics studied, and the views and arguments of the scholars prescribed for study including: Hare, Tillich, Hume and Wiles

Students should also be able to use specialist language and terminology appropriately.

  1. Essay: Religious Language
  2. Essay: Miracles
  3. Essay: Self, Death and Afterlife

 

Some assessments will be set as homework, but students will also be given timed assessments in class to work on their exam techniques. Assessments should also include topics from year 12 and 13 which ensures students are revisiting these topics throughout the course.

13

1

Ethics

 

Introduction to Meta Ethics: Divine Command Theory, Naturalism, Non-Naturalism.

 

Free Will and Moral Responsibility: The conditions of moral responsibility, the extent of moral responsibility, the relevance of moral responsibility.

 

Conscience: Religious and non-religious beliefs about conscience, the role of conscience, the value of conscience as a moral guide.

 

Bentham and Kant: Comparison of Bentham and Kant’s ethical theories.

Students will begin to study meta ethics in which they will begin to understand nature of ethical theories and moral judgements, the meaning of right and wrong. Within this topic students will examine Divine Command Theory, Naturalism and Non-Naturalism. Students will consider the influence of these beliefs and teachings on individuals, communities and societies. They will also analyse and evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of these ideas.

Students will then move on to study Free will and moral responsibility. They will consider the conditions of moral responsibility looking at the relationship between freedom and responsibility with reference to examples, factors which inhibit our responsibility etc. Students will study the various approaches surrounding free will, libertarianism, hard determinism, compatibilism. They will then evaluate the relevance of moral responsibility to reward and punishment. This leads on to the examining of the differing beliefs surrounding conscience. Students will consider differing ideas, religious and non-religious, about the nature of conscience. They will analyse the role of conscience in making moral decisions with reference to telling lies, breaking promises, and

adultery. Students will evaluate the usefulness of conscience as a moral guide. Students will conclude year 2 ethics by studying the ethical theories put forward by Bentham and Kant. Students will compare the key ideas of Bentham and Kant about moral decision making and consider how far these two ethical theories are consistent with religious moral decision making.

1: Meta-Ethics

 

2: Year 12 Content

 

3: Free Will and Moral Responsibility

 

4: Year 12 Content

 

5: Conscience

 

6: Bentham and Kant

 

 

Some assessments will be set as homework, but students will also be given timed assessments in class to work on their exam techniques. Assessments should also include topics from year 12 and 13 which ensures students are revisiting these topics throughout the course.

13

2

Christianity

Students are required to study those aspects of the religious beliefs, teachings, values and practices of Christianity specified and the different ways in which these are expressed in the lives of individuals, communities and societies.

They should develop a knowledge and critical understanding of:

  • the specified material
  • how the texts specified for study are interpreted and applied e.g. the concept of soul; resurrection of the flesh as expressed in the writings of Augustine; spiritual resurrection; the significance of 1 Corinthians 15:42-44 and 50-54.
  • the influence of beliefs and teachings on individuals, communities and societies
  • the causes, meanings and significance of similarities and differences in religious thought belief and practice within Christianity
  • approaches to the study of religion and belief.

They should be able to analyse and evaluate issues arising from the topics studied, and the views and arguments of the scholars prescribed for study.

  1. Essay: Christianity, Gender and Sexuality
  2. Christianity and Science
  3. Christianity, Migration and Religious Pluralism

 

In Feb/Mar, students will take their Mock Exams – there will be a 3-hour Philosophy and Ethics paper and a 90-minute Christianity paper.

13

3

Dialogues

This section of the specification is focused on the connections between various elements of the course and requires students to develop breadth and depth in their understanding of the connections between the knowledge, understanding and skills set out in the specification. Students will be required to demonstrate a critical awareness of these connections and to analyse their nature.

Beliefs and teachings about:

  • God
  • self, death and the afterlife
  • sources of wisdom and authority
  • religious experience
  • the relationship between scientific and religious discourses
  • the truth claims of other religions
  • miracles.

The following issues, and the impact of the discussion on religious belief past and present, should be considered:

  • How far the belief is reasonable – that is based on reason and/or consistent with reason.
  • How meaningful the statements of faith are, and for whom.
  • How coherent the beliefs are, and how consistent they are with other beliefs in the belief system.
  • The relevance of philosophical enquiry for religious faith, with particular reference to the debate about the nature of faith as ‘belief in’ or ‘belief that’.

Christian responses to the following approaches to moral decision-making in the light of key Christian moral principles:

  • deontological, with reference to Kant.
  • teleological and consequential, with reference to Bentham.
  • character based, with reference to virtue ethics.

How far Christian ethics can be considered to be deontological, teleological, consequential,

Christian responses to the issues of human life and death and issues of animal life and death prescribed for study; theft and lying; marriage; homosexuality and transgender issues; genetic engineering.

Christian responses to issues surrounding wealth, tolerance and freedom of religious expression.

Christian understandings of free will and moral responsibility, and the value of conscience in Christian moral decision-making.

The impact of other ethical perspectives and ethical studies on Christian views about these issues, both past and present. This may include challenges to and support for Christian views; compatibility of Christian views with those of other ethical perspectives; the relative strengths and weaknesses of Christian perspectives and other ethical perspectives studied on these issues; the implications of criticisms of Christian ethical teaching for the religion as a whole and its sources of authority.

Revision for final exams.

  1. Essay: Dialogues between Philosophy and Christianity
  2. Essay: Dialogues between Ethics and Christianity

 

In preparation for final exams, students will participate in a range of timed essays for all aspects of the syllabus.

KS5 Intent (Core RE)

Students who have not opted for A Level Religious Studies will be expected to attend one lesson per week for our Core RE course. This is a non-examination pathway with certification provided by the Archdiocese of Liverpool. Students will cover 4 units in Year 12 and three in Year 13 exploring a range of themes including: The Holocaust, Fairtrade, God in the Now, World Religions, Religious Experience and Ethical Issues. Students will also participate in planning, organising and leading a charitable event in Term 1 of Year 12. They will prepare themselves as global citizens within the context of Christian values whilst exploring such key skills as effective communication, leadership, critical analysis and presenting personal views in a fair and balanced manner supported by reliable evidence.

Implementation:

Year

Term

Topic

Knowledge, skills and understanding

Window for Assessment

12

1

Faith in Action

Christianity is an active faith and one which requires action. For this reason, students in Yr12 will start their Core RE programme by exploring Christian charities leading to their main task of delivering a fundraising event to a group of Yr7 students whilst fundraising for a Christian charity of their choice. They will plan, prepare, collaborate as a group, develop effective communication skills, reflect on Health and Safety, work to deadlines, present an engaging and enjoyable experience and will evaluate their efforts.

Charity Assessment – Dec

 

12

2

God in the Now

 

Fairtrade

Students will build on the charity event by exploring the demands of religious commitment in everyday life. They will reflect on key questions of life through critical discussion leading to the development of their own faith or belief position. Yr12 students will develop their thinking skills as they apply theological and ethical principles to the problem of evil and suffering.  

 

In a more practical sense, students will then consider the meaning of Fairtrade through an exploration of origins, importance and implementation. Students will investigate products from producers to sellers and focus on the boycotts in South Africa as an example. They will participate in the ‘Trading Game’ to develop ethical and moral decision-making skills whilst considering profit and loss and working collaboratively as a team in competition with others. Students will evaluate the success of the Fairtrade industry from a religious perspective. 

Fair Trade or Cafod Assessment – Mar

12

3

The Holocaust

The phrase ‘Lest we forget’ certainly applies to the genocide of World War II involving the Jewish people – The Shoah (The Holocaust). Yr12 students will initially dismiss assumptions through critical analysis before examining the origins of anti-Semitism. They will reflect on survivor testimonies and critically consider the ideas of propaganda, responsibility, sources of hatred and the religious responses to the Holocaust. Students will evaluate how the Holocaust should be remembered into the future.

The Holocaust Assessment – June

13

1

Religious Experience

 

Ethical Issues

The opening term of Yr13 will build on the learning and skills established in Yr12. In Religious Experience, students will develop an understanding of spirituality and how people can and have experienced religion in a variety of ways including prayer, healing, miracles and stigmata. They will grow to understand the means of engaging in religious experiences and understand the relationship between religious belief, personal faith and lived experience.

In Ethical Issues, students will understand what ‘ethics’ means and will critically apply ethical theories to such issues as euthanasia and abortion. They will evaluate the meaning of life and death through religion and wider society and justify their own position with regards to ethical issues. They will critically discuss how a person’s beliefs can sometimes conflict with those of wider society before demonstrating a variety of skills that will show them how to respond to opportunities and responsibilities of life experience.

Padre Pio Assessment – Nov

 

13

2

World Religions

Students will reflect on the demands of religious commitment in everyday life through a study of Judaism and Islam two of the six major World Religions. They will discuss questions of life, explore methods of engaging in religious practice in contemporary society and will understand the relationship between religious belief and lived experience. As a result, students will be able to reflect more deeply on their own faith position.

Ethical Issues Assessment – Jan

World Religions Assessment – Mar